From 'growth centre' to 'cluster': restructuring, regional development and the Teeside chemical industry

Keith Chapman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Agglomeration offers both static, cost-based advantages and dynamic, innovation-related benefits to participating firms. These ideas have informed regional development policy from the growth poles/centres of the 1950/1960s to the contemporary focus on clusters. Although such policies imply the theoretical prospect of regional diversification by exploiting supply-chain and information-based/knowledge-based relationships, in practice they tend to promote regional specialisation. The experiences of many old industrial areas emphasise the risks of specialisation as advantages mutate into liabilities (territorial lock-in). These experiences are ignored in much of the clusters discourse which often lacks historical perspective. This paper provides such perspective by reflecting upon the relationships between the dynamics of industry evolution, agglomeration, and regional development policy with reference to the chemical industry on Teesside in North East England.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)597-615
    Number of pages18
    JournalEnvironment and Planning A
    Volume37
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2005

    Keywords

    • ECONOMIC-GEOGRAPHY
    • COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
    • SUNK COSTS
    • INNOVATION
    • DISTRICTS
    • NETWORKS
    • POLICY
    • POLES

    Cite this

    From 'growth centre' to 'cluster': restructuring, regional development and the Teeside chemical industry. / Chapman, Keith.

    In: Environment and Planning A, Vol. 37, 05.2005, p. 597-615.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{c5f38fe1fa0d4952a03350ec222e9ed6,
    title = "From 'growth centre' to 'cluster': restructuring, regional development and the Teeside chemical industry",
    abstract = "Agglomeration offers both static, cost-based advantages and dynamic, innovation-related benefits to participating firms. These ideas have informed regional development policy from the growth poles/centres of the 1950/1960s to the contemporary focus on clusters. Although such policies imply the theoretical prospect of regional diversification by exploiting supply-chain and information-based/knowledge-based relationships, in practice they tend to promote regional specialisation. The experiences of many old industrial areas emphasise the risks of specialisation as advantages mutate into liabilities (territorial lock-in). These experiences are ignored in much of the clusters discourse which often lacks historical perspective. This paper provides such perspective by reflecting upon the relationships between the dynamics of industry evolution, agglomeration, and regional development policy with reference to the chemical industry on Teesside in North East England.",
    keywords = "ECONOMIC-GEOGRAPHY, COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE, SUNK COSTS, INNOVATION, DISTRICTS, NETWORKS, POLICY, POLES",
    author = "Keith Chapman",
    year = "2005",
    month = "5",
    doi = "10.1068/A36270",
    language = "English",
    volume = "37",
    pages = "597--615",
    journal = "Environment and Planning A",
    issn = "0308-518X",
    publisher = "Pion Ltd.",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - From 'growth centre' to 'cluster': restructuring, regional development and the Teeside chemical industry

    AU - Chapman, Keith

    PY - 2005/5

    Y1 - 2005/5

    N2 - Agglomeration offers both static, cost-based advantages and dynamic, innovation-related benefits to participating firms. These ideas have informed regional development policy from the growth poles/centres of the 1950/1960s to the contemporary focus on clusters. Although such policies imply the theoretical prospect of regional diversification by exploiting supply-chain and information-based/knowledge-based relationships, in practice they tend to promote regional specialisation. The experiences of many old industrial areas emphasise the risks of specialisation as advantages mutate into liabilities (territorial lock-in). These experiences are ignored in much of the clusters discourse which often lacks historical perspective. This paper provides such perspective by reflecting upon the relationships between the dynamics of industry evolution, agglomeration, and regional development policy with reference to the chemical industry on Teesside in North East England.

    AB - Agglomeration offers both static, cost-based advantages and dynamic, innovation-related benefits to participating firms. These ideas have informed regional development policy from the growth poles/centres of the 1950/1960s to the contemporary focus on clusters. Although such policies imply the theoretical prospect of regional diversification by exploiting supply-chain and information-based/knowledge-based relationships, in practice they tend to promote regional specialisation. The experiences of many old industrial areas emphasise the risks of specialisation as advantages mutate into liabilities (territorial lock-in). These experiences are ignored in much of the clusters discourse which often lacks historical perspective. This paper provides such perspective by reflecting upon the relationships between the dynamics of industry evolution, agglomeration, and regional development policy with reference to the chemical industry on Teesside in North East England.

    KW - ECONOMIC-GEOGRAPHY

    KW - COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    KW - SUNK COSTS

    KW - INNOVATION

    KW - DISTRICTS

    KW - NETWORKS

    KW - POLICY

    KW - POLES

    U2 - 10.1068/A36270

    DO - 10.1068/A36270

    M3 - Article

    VL - 37

    SP - 597

    EP - 615

    JO - Environment and Planning A

    JF - Environment and Planning A

    SN - 0308-518X

    ER -