From the archive: Memory conformity: Can eyewitnesses influence each other's memories for an event?

Fiona Gabbert, Amina Memon, Kevin Allan

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

Abstract

This paper established a new direction for researchers interested in the malleability of memory in a forensic context or eyewitness paradigm. The paper was the first to extend ‘misinformation’ effects established in controlled laboratory settings to witness reports following discussions with fellow witnesses. This was achieved within a relatively naturalistic situation and it persuasively demonstrated what had long been observed in the social psychological literature: that the opinions of others affect our behaviour but can also quite dramatically alter our reports as well as our beliefs and memories. When eyewitnesses comply with the reports of others in a social interaction, the longterm consequences for their recollections are clearly substantial. This paper has stimulated much research which has reinforced and extended the basic findings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S163-S174
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume25
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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Interpersonal Relations
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Psychology
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Witness
Conformity
Eyewitness
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Psychological Literature
Controlled
Paradigm
Recollection
Social Interaction

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From the archive : Memory conformity: Can eyewitnesses influence each other's memories for an event? / Gabbert, Fiona; Memon, Amina; Allan, Kevin.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 25, No. S1, 01.2011, p. S163-S174.

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

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