Genetic and environmental factors in late onset dementia

possible role for early parental death

Lawrence J Whalley, Roger T Staff, Alison D Murray, Ian J Deary, John M Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective
We aimed to investigate three reports of a possible role of early parental death in late onset dementia. We tested a multivariate model of risk factors for late onset dementia that included established (female sex, a family history of dementia, APOE ε4) and putative influences (vascular risk factors, years of full-time education, parental ages at death, and childhood IQ) on dementia risk.

Methods
We examined contributions of early life and late life risk factors for dementia by using childhood social and family data and blood samples obtained at interview at age about 78 years. In 1997–1999, we recruited 281 subjects without dementia from a 1932 Scottish IQ survey of children born in 1921 and followed them up to 2010 (at age 88). Binary logistic regression and Bayesian structural equation modelling were used to model dementia risk.

Results
Risk of dementia was associated with increasing age from 77 to 88 years, female sex, death of either parent before age 11 and APOE ε4 genotype. Family history of dementia, childhood IQ, years of education and vascular risk factors did not contribute to the model.

Conclusions
Our multivariate models of the possible causes of late onset dementia confirm previous associations of dementia with female sex and APOE ε4 genotype and supports earlier reports of a role for early parental death. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-81
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date22 Jul 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Parental Death
Dementia
Genotype
Education
Nuclear Family

Keywords

  • Age of Onset
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Apolipoprotein E4
  • Dementia
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Parental Death
  • Risk Factors
  • Sex Factors
  • Childhood Intelligence

Cite this

@article{4eccbffd13134dd9bb2981f161fa0e0a,
title = "Genetic and environmental factors in late onset dementia: possible role for early parental death",
abstract = "ObjectiveWe aimed to investigate three reports of a possible role of early parental death in late onset dementia. We tested a multivariate model of risk factors for late onset dementia that included established (female sex, a family history of dementia, APOE ε4) and putative influences (vascular risk factors, years of full-time education, parental ages at death, and childhood IQ) on dementia risk.MethodsWe examined contributions of early life and late life risk factors for dementia by using childhood social and family data and blood samples obtained at interview at age about 78 years. In 1997–1999, we recruited 281 subjects without dementia from a 1932 Scottish IQ survey of children born in 1921 and followed them up to 2010 (at age 88). Binary logistic regression and Bayesian structural equation modelling were used to model dementia risk.ResultsRisk of dementia was associated with increasing age from 77 to 88 years, female sex, death of either parent before age 11 and APOE ε4 genotype. Family history of dementia, childhood IQ, years of education and vascular risk factors did not contribute to the model.ConclusionsOur multivariate models of the possible causes of late onset dementia confirm previous associations of dementia with female sex and APOE ε4 genotype and supports earlier reports of a role for early parental death. Copyright {\circledC} 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",
keywords = "Age of Onset, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Apolipoprotein E4, Dementia, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Parental Death, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Childhood Intelligence",
author = "Whalley, {Lawrence J} and Staff, {Roger T} and Murray, {Alison D} and Deary, {Ian J} and Starr, {John M}",
note = "Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance provided by Wellcome Trust and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK. Copyright {\circledC} 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1002/gps.3792",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "75--81",
journal = "International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "0885-6230",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic and environmental factors in late onset dementia

T2 - possible role for early parental death

AU - Whalley, Lawrence J

AU - Staff, Roger T

AU - Murray, Alison D

AU - Deary, Ian J

AU - Starr, John M

N1 - Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance provided by Wellcome Trust and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - ObjectiveWe aimed to investigate three reports of a possible role of early parental death in late onset dementia. We tested a multivariate model of risk factors for late onset dementia that included established (female sex, a family history of dementia, APOE ε4) and putative influences (vascular risk factors, years of full-time education, parental ages at death, and childhood IQ) on dementia risk.MethodsWe examined contributions of early life and late life risk factors for dementia by using childhood social and family data and blood samples obtained at interview at age about 78 years. In 1997–1999, we recruited 281 subjects without dementia from a 1932 Scottish IQ survey of children born in 1921 and followed them up to 2010 (at age 88). Binary logistic regression and Bayesian structural equation modelling were used to model dementia risk.ResultsRisk of dementia was associated with increasing age from 77 to 88 years, female sex, death of either parent before age 11 and APOE ε4 genotype. Family history of dementia, childhood IQ, years of education and vascular risk factors did not contribute to the model.ConclusionsOur multivariate models of the possible causes of late onset dementia confirm previous associations of dementia with female sex and APOE ε4 genotype and supports earlier reports of a role for early parental death. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

AB - ObjectiveWe aimed to investigate three reports of a possible role of early parental death in late onset dementia. We tested a multivariate model of risk factors for late onset dementia that included established (female sex, a family history of dementia, APOE ε4) and putative influences (vascular risk factors, years of full-time education, parental ages at death, and childhood IQ) on dementia risk.MethodsWe examined contributions of early life and late life risk factors for dementia by using childhood social and family data and blood samples obtained at interview at age about 78 years. In 1997–1999, we recruited 281 subjects without dementia from a 1932 Scottish IQ survey of children born in 1921 and followed them up to 2010 (at age 88). Binary logistic regression and Bayesian structural equation modelling were used to model dementia risk.ResultsRisk of dementia was associated with increasing age from 77 to 88 years, female sex, death of either parent before age 11 and APOE ε4 genotype. Family history of dementia, childhood IQ, years of education and vascular risk factors did not contribute to the model.ConclusionsOur multivariate models of the possible causes of late onset dementia confirm previous associations of dementia with female sex and APOE ε4 genotype and supports earlier reports of a role for early parental death. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

KW - Age of Onset

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Apolipoprotein E4

KW - Dementia

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Logistic Models

KW - Male

KW - Multivariate Analysis

KW - Parental Death

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Childhood Intelligence

U2 - 10.1002/gps.3792

DO - 10.1002/gps.3792

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 75

EP - 81

JO - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 0885-6230

IS - 1

ER -