Genetic variation and the lipid response to dietary intervention: a systematic review

Lindsey Fiona Masson, Geraldine McNeill, Alison Avenell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is wide interindividual variation in the lipid and lipoprotein responses to dietary change, and the existence of consistent hypo- and hyperresponders supports the hypothesis that responsiveness is related to genetic variation. Many studies have investigated the possibility that the heterogeneity in responsiveness to changes in dietary fat, cholesterol, and fiber intake is explained by variation in genes whose products affect lipoprotein metabolism, eg, apolipoproteins, enzymes, and receptors. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to investigate the effect of genetic variation on the lipid response to dietary intervention. A search strategy for the MEDLINE database retrieved 2540 articles from 1966 to February 2002. This strategy was adapted and performed on the EMBASE database, which retrieved 2473 articles from 1980 to week 9, 2002. Reference lists from relevant journal articles were also checked. This is the first systematic review of the literature, and it summarizes results available from 74 relevant articles. There is evidence to suggest that variation in the genes for apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo A-IV, apo B, and apo E contributes to the heterogeneity in the lipid response to dietary intervention. However, the effects of genetic variation are not consistently seen and are sometimes conflicting. Future studies need to have much larger sample sizes based on power calculations and carefully controlled dietary interventions and should investigate the effects of polymorphisms in multiple genes instead of the effects of polymorphisms in single genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1098-1111
Number of pages13
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume77
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • polymorphism
  • genotype
  • diet
  • lipids
  • lipoproteins
  • cardiovascular disease
  • APOLIPOPROTEIN-E POLYMORPHISM
  • DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN-CHOLESTEROL
  • ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN
  • DIFFERENT APOE PHENOTYPES
  • SATURATED FATTY-ACIDS
  • SERUM-CHOLESTEROL
  • PLASMA-CHOLESTEROL
  • FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA
  • B GENE
  • E GENOTYPE

Cite this

Genetic variation and the lipid response to dietary intervention: a systematic review. / Masson, Lindsey Fiona; McNeill, Geraldine; Avenell, Alison.

In: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 77, No. 5, 05.2003, p. 1098-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e0d3f0dad1404a84a7ef734e15b413f2,
title = "Genetic variation and the lipid response to dietary intervention: a systematic review",
abstract = "There is wide interindividual variation in the lipid and lipoprotein responses to dietary change, and the existence of consistent hypo- and hyperresponders supports the hypothesis that responsiveness is related to genetic variation. Many studies have investigated the possibility that the heterogeneity in responsiveness to changes in dietary fat, cholesterol, and fiber intake is explained by variation in genes whose products affect lipoprotein metabolism, eg, apolipoproteins, enzymes, and receptors. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to investigate the effect of genetic variation on the lipid response to dietary intervention. A search strategy for the MEDLINE database retrieved 2540 articles from 1966 to February 2002. This strategy was adapted and performed on the EMBASE database, which retrieved 2473 articles from 1980 to week 9, 2002. Reference lists from relevant journal articles were also checked. This is the first systematic review of the literature, and it summarizes results available from 74 relevant articles. There is evidence to suggest that variation in the genes for apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo A-IV, apo B, and apo E contributes to the heterogeneity in the lipid response to dietary intervention. However, the effects of genetic variation are not consistently seen and are sometimes conflicting. Future studies need to have much larger sample sizes based on power calculations and carefully controlled dietary interventions and should investigate the effects of polymorphisms in multiple genes instead of the effects of polymorphisms in single genes.",
keywords = "polymorphism, genotype, diet, lipids, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, APOLIPOPROTEIN-E POLYMORPHISM, DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN-CHOLESTEROL, ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN, DIFFERENT APOE PHENOTYPES, SATURATED FATTY-ACIDS, SERUM-CHOLESTEROL, PLASMA-CHOLESTEROL, FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA, B GENE, E GENOTYPE",
author = "Masson, {Lindsey Fiona} and Geraldine McNeill and Alison Avenell",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "77",
pages = "1098--1111",
journal = "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic variation and the lipid response to dietary intervention: a systematic review

AU - Masson, Lindsey Fiona

AU - McNeill, Geraldine

AU - Avenell, Alison

PY - 2003/5

Y1 - 2003/5

N2 - There is wide interindividual variation in the lipid and lipoprotein responses to dietary change, and the existence of consistent hypo- and hyperresponders supports the hypothesis that responsiveness is related to genetic variation. Many studies have investigated the possibility that the heterogeneity in responsiveness to changes in dietary fat, cholesterol, and fiber intake is explained by variation in genes whose products affect lipoprotein metabolism, eg, apolipoproteins, enzymes, and receptors. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to investigate the effect of genetic variation on the lipid response to dietary intervention. A search strategy for the MEDLINE database retrieved 2540 articles from 1966 to February 2002. This strategy was adapted and performed on the EMBASE database, which retrieved 2473 articles from 1980 to week 9, 2002. Reference lists from relevant journal articles were also checked. This is the first systematic review of the literature, and it summarizes results available from 74 relevant articles. There is evidence to suggest that variation in the genes for apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo A-IV, apo B, and apo E contributes to the heterogeneity in the lipid response to dietary intervention. However, the effects of genetic variation are not consistently seen and are sometimes conflicting. Future studies need to have much larger sample sizes based on power calculations and carefully controlled dietary interventions and should investigate the effects of polymorphisms in multiple genes instead of the effects of polymorphisms in single genes.

AB - There is wide interindividual variation in the lipid and lipoprotein responses to dietary change, and the existence of consistent hypo- and hyperresponders supports the hypothesis that responsiveness is related to genetic variation. Many studies have investigated the possibility that the heterogeneity in responsiveness to changes in dietary fat, cholesterol, and fiber intake is explained by variation in genes whose products affect lipoprotein metabolism, eg, apolipoproteins, enzymes, and receptors. A systematic review of the literature was carried out to investigate the effect of genetic variation on the lipid response to dietary intervention. A search strategy for the MEDLINE database retrieved 2540 articles from 1966 to February 2002. This strategy was adapted and performed on the EMBASE database, which retrieved 2473 articles from 1980 to week 9, 2002. Reference lists from relevant journal articles were also checked. This is the first systematic review of the literature, and it summarizes results available from 74 relevant articles. There is evidence to suggest that variation in the genes for apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo A-IV, apo B, and apo E contributes to the heterogeneity in the lipid response to dietary intervention. However, the effects of genetic variation are not consistently seen and are sometimes conflicting. Future studies need to have much larger sample sizes based on power calculations and carefully controlled dietary interventions and should investigate the effects of polymorphisms in multiple genes instead of the effects of polymorphisms in single genes.

KW - polymorphism

KW - genotype

KW - diet

KW - lipids

KW - lipoproteins

KW - cardiovascular disease

KW - APOLIPOPROTEIN-E POLYMORPHISM

KW - DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN-CHOLESTEROL

KW - ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN

KW - DIFFERENT APOE PHENOTYPES

KW - SATURATED FATTY-ACIDS

KW - SERUM-CHOLESTEROL

KW - PLASMA-CHOLESTEROL

KW - FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA

KW - B GENE

KW - E GENOTYPE

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 1098

EP - 1111

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 5

ER -