Geochemistry and origin of organic-rich sediment veins in fractured granitic basement, Helmsdale, Sutherlandshire, UK

John Parnell, Mas'Ud Baba, Stephen Bowden, Liam Bullock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Black sediment veins up to 2 cm width penetrate the Caledonian Helmsdale Granite in the vicinity of the Helmsdale Fault, onshore Moray Firth. The black colour and geochemistry of the veins reflect a high content of organic carbon. Both Devonian and Jurassic shales are conceivable available sources, but sterane compositions relate the organic matter to the Jurassic shales. A content of extractable organic matter higher than in the shales suggests that the carbon in the veins represents oil rather than mechanically mobilized shale. The oil was present during sediment vein emplacement. The veins were emplaced forcefully, which may reflect high fluid pressure associated with post-Jurassic movement on the Helmsdale Fault.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalMarine and Petroleum Geology
Volume88
Early online date12 Aug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Fingerprint

geochemistry
basements
veins
sediments
Jurassic
shales
sediment
organic matter
oil
fluid pressure
Caledonian orogeny
oils
shale
emplacement
granite
organic carbon
carbon
color

Keywords

  • Injectites
  • Moray Firth
  • Helmsdale Fault
  • Helmsdale Granite
  • Great Glen Fault

Cite this

Geochemistry and origin of organic-rich sediment veins in fractured granitic basement, Helmsdale, Sutherlandshire, UK. / Parnell, John; Baba, Mas'Ud; Bowden, Stephen; Bullock, Liam.

In: Marine and Petroleum Geology, Vol. 88, 12.2017, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f4a117859a474960b5c5c01fc9fa1dd3,
title = "Geochemistry and origin of organic-rich sediment veins in fractured granitic basement, Helmsdale, Sutherlandshire, UK",
abstract = "Black sediment veins up to 2 cm width penetrate the Caledonian Helmsdale Granite in the vicinity of the Helmsdale Fault, onshore Moray Firth. The black colour and geochemistry of the veins reflect a high content of organic carbon. Both Devonian and Jurassic shales are conceivable available sources, but sterane compositions relate the organic matter to the Jurassic shales. A content of extractable organic matter higher than in the shales suggests that the carbon in the veins represents oil rather than mechanically mobilized shale. The oil was present during sediment vein emplacement. The veins were emplaced forcefully, which may reflect high fluid pressure associated with post-Jurassic movement on the Helmsdale Fault.",
keywords = "Injectites, Moray Firth, Helmsdale Fault, Helmsdale Granite, Great Glen Fault",
author = "John Parnell and Mas'Ud Baba and Stephen Bowden and Liam Bullock",
note = "Acknowledgements MB is in receipt of a PhD studentship from the Petroleum Technology Development Fund of Nigeria. LB is supported by NERC grant NE/M010953/1. C. Taylor, W. Ritchie and J. Johnston provided skilled technical support. Sulphur isotope measurements were made at SUERC. The manuscript benefitted substantially from the careful reviews of A.G. Leslie and an anonymous referee.",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2017.08.013",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
pages = "107--114",
journal = "Marine and Petroleum Geology",
issn = "0264-8172",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geochemistry and origin of organic-rich sediment veins in fractured granitic basement, Helmsdale, Sutherlandshire, UK

AU - Parnell, John

AU - Baba, Mas'Ud

AU - Bowden, Stephen

AU - Bullock, Liam

N1 - Acknowledgements MB is in receipt of a PhD studentship from the Petroleum Technology Development Fund of Nigeria. LB is supported by NERC grant NE/M010953/1. C. Taylor, W. Ritchie and J. Johnston provided skilled technical support. Sulphur isotope measurements were made at SUERC. The manuscript benefitted substantially from the careful reviews of A.G. Leslie and an anonymous referee.

PY - 2017/12

Y1 - 2017/12

N2 - Black sediment veins up to 2 cm width penetrate the Caledonian Helmsdale Granite in the vicinity of the Helmsdale Fault, onshore Moray Firth. The black colour and geochemistry of the veins reflect a high content of organic carbon. Both Devonian and Jurassic shales are conceivable available sources, but sterane compositions relate the organic matter to the Jurassic shales. A content of extractable organic matter higher than in the shales suggests that the carbon in the veins represents oil rather than mechanically mobilized shale. The oil was present during sediment vein emplacement. The veins were emplaced forcefully, which may reflect high fluid pressure associated with post-Jurassic movement on the Helmsdale Fault.

AB - Black sediment veins up to 2 cm width penetrate the Caledonian Helmsdale Granite in the vicinity of the Helmsdale Fault, onshore Moray Firth. The black colour and geochemistry of the veins reflect a high content of organic carbon. Both Devonian and Jurassic shales are conceivable available sources, but sterane compositions relate the organic matter to the Jurassic shales. A content of extractable organic matter higher than in the shales suggests that the carbon in the veins represents oil rather than mechanically mobilized shale. The oil was present during sediment vein emplacement. The veins were emplaced forcefully, which may reflect high fluid pressure associated with post-Jurassic movement on the Helmsdale Fault.

KW - Injectites

KW - Moray Firth

KW - Helmsdale Fault

KW - Helmsdale Granite

KW - Great Glen Fault

U2 - 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2017.08.013

DO - 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2017.08.013

M3 - Article

VL - 88

SP - 107

EP - 114

JO - Marine and Petroleum Geology

JF - Marine and Petroleum Geology

SN - 0264-8172

ER -