Geodynamic implications of paleomagnetic data from Tertiary sediments in Sakhalin, Russia (NW Pacific)

R Weaver, A P Roberts, R Flecker, David Macdonald, L M Fot'yanova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[1] N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults, which were active in the Tertiary, transect Sakhalin, Russia, while Mesozoic forearc and accretionary rocks testify to an earlier period of subduction. Several kinematic models have been proposed for the region, but the details required to constrain these models, such as the timing of the transition from subduction to strike-slip tectonics in Sakhalin, are still unknown. Even first-order tectonic features, such as the boundaries of the plates with which Sakhalin evolved during the Tertiary, are poorly known. Paleomagnetic results from around Sakhalin were obtained to constrain the geodynamic evolution of the region. Comparison of paleomagnetic inclination data with the apparent polar wander paths for the Eurasian, Pacific, and North American Plates suggests that Sakhalin probably evolved with the North American Plate, although a history including the Eurasian Plate cannot be ruled out. Paleomagnetic declination data suggest that significant clockwise vertical axis rotation has occurred in Sakhalin since the mid-Paleocene. It is likely that this rotational deformation was accommodated by Tertiary activity on right-lateral strike-slip faults, which may be associated with the opening of the Japan Sea, Tatar Strait, and Kuril Basin. These data contradict a published kinematic model for eastern Sakhalin, where counterclockwise vertical axis rotations were predicted for Neogene basins in the East Sakhalin Mountains. Agreement is better, however, with published paleomagnetic data from southern Sakhalin, where clockwise vertical axis rotations were documented.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume108 (B2)
Issue number2066
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2003

Keywords

  • paleomagnetism
  • Sakhalin
  • plate tectonics
  • Okhotsk Sea
  • Asia
  • cenozoic
  • WESTERN TRANSVERSE RANGES
  • INDIA-EURASIA COLLISION
  • STRIKE-SLIP-FAULT
  • JAPAN SEA
  • REMANENCE ANISOTROPY
  • SOUTHERN-CALIFORNIA
  • NEW-ZEALAND
  • ANHYSTERETIC REMANENCE
  • EXTRUSION TECTONICS
  • BLOCK ROTATIONS

Cite this

Geodynamic implications of paleomagnetic data from Tertiary sediments in Sakhalin, Russia (NW Pacific). / Weaver, R ; Roberts, A P ; Flecker, R ; Macdonald, David; Fot'yanova, L M .

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108 (B2), No. 2066, 01.02.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaver, R ; Roberts, A P ; Flecker, R ; Macdonald, David ; Fot'yanova, L M . / Geodynamic implications of paleomagnetic data from Tertiary sediments in Sakhalin, Russia (NW Pacific). In: Journal of Geophysical Research. 2003 ; Vol. 108 (B2), No. 2066.
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abstract = "[1] N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults, which were active in the Tertiary, transect Sakhalin, Russia, while Mesozoic forearc and accretionary rocks testify to an earlier period of subduction. Several kinematic models have been proposed for the region, but the details required to constrain these models, such as the timing of the transition from subduction to strike-slip tectonics in Sakhalin, are still unknown. Even first-order tectonic features, such as the boundaries of the plates with which Sakhalin evolved during the Tertiary, are poorly known. Paleomagnetic results from around Sakhalin were obtained to constrain the geodynamic evolution of the region. Comparison of paleomagnetic inclination data with the apparent polar wander paths for the Eurasian, Pacific, and North American Plates suggests that Sakhalin probably evolved with the North American Plate, although a history including the Eurasian Plate cannot be ruled out. Paleomagnetic declination data suggest that significant clockwise vertical axis rotation has occurred in Sakhalin since the mid-Paleocene. It is likely that this rotational deformation was accommodated by Tertiary activity on right-lateral strike-slip faults, which may be associated with the opening of the Japan Sea, Tatar Strait, and Kuril Basin. These data contradict a published kinematic model for eastern Sakhalin, where counterclockwise vertical axis rotations were predicted for Neogene basins in the East Sakhalin Mountains. Agreement is better, however, with published paleomagnetic data from southern Sakhalin, where clockwise vertical axis rotations were documented.",
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T1 - Geodynamic implications of paleomagnetic data from Tertiary sediments in Sakhalin, Russia (NW Pacific)

AU - Weaver, R

AU - Roberts, A P

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AU - Macdonald, David

AU - Fot'yanova, L M

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N2 - [1] N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults, which were active in the Tertiary, transect Sakhalin, Russia, while Mesozoic forearc and accretionary rocks testify to an earlier period of subduction. Several kinematic models have been proposed for the region, but the details required to constrain these models, such as the timing of the transition from subduction to strike-slip tectonics in Sakhalin, are still unknown. Even first-order tectonic features, such as the boundaries of the plates with which Sakhalin evolved during the Tertiary, are poorly known. Paleomagnetic results from around Sakhalin were obtained to constrain the geodynamic evolution of the region. Comparison of paleomagnetic inclination data with the apparent polar wander paths for the Eurasian, Pacific, and North American Plates suggests that Sakhalin probably evolved with the North American Plate, although a history including the Eurasian Plate cannot be ruled out. Paleomagnetic declination data suggest that significant clockwise vertical axis rotation has occurred in Sakhalin since the mid-Paleocene. It is likely that this rotational deformation was accommodated by Tertiary activity on right-lateral strike-slip faults, which may be associated with the opening of the Japan Sea, Tatar Strait, and Kuril Basin. These data contradict a published kinematic model for eastern Sakhalin, where counterclockwise vertical axis rotations were predicted for Neogene basins in the East Sakhalin Mountains. Agreement is better, however, with published paleomagnetic data from southern Sakhalin, where clockwise vertical axis rotations were documented.

AB - [1] N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults, which were active in the Tertiary, transect Sakhalin, Russia, while Mesozoic forearc and accretionary rocks testify to an earlier period of subduction. Several kinematic models have been proposed for the region, but the details required to constrain these models, such as the timing of the transition from subduction to strike-slip tectonics in Sakhalin, are still unknown. Even first-order tectonic features, such as the boundaries of the plates with which Sakhalin evolved during the Tertiary, are poorly known. Paleomagnetic results from around Sakhalin were obtained to constrain the geodynamic evolution of the region. Comparison of paleomagnetic inclination data with the apparent polar wander paths for the Eurasian, Pacific, and North American Plates suggests that Sakhalin probably evolved with the North American Plate, although a history including the Eurasian Plate cannot be ruled out. Paleomagnetic declination data suggest that significant clockwise vertical axis rotation has occurred in Sakhalin since the mid-Paleocene. It is likely that this rotational deformation was accommodated by Tertiary activity on right-lateral strike-slip faults, which may be associated with the opening of the Japan Sea, Tatar Strait, and Kuril Basin. These data contradict a published kinematic model for eastern Sakhalin, where counterclockwise vertical axis rotations were predicted for Neogene basins in the East Sakhalin Mountains. Agreement is better, however, with published paleomagnetic data from southern Sakhalin, where clockwise vertical axis rotations were documented.

KW - paleomagnetism

KW - Sakhalin

KW - plate tectonics

KW - Okhotsk Sea

KW - Asia

KW - cenozoic

KW - WESTERN TRANSVERSE RANGES

KW - INDIA-EURASIA COLLISION

KW - STRIKE-SLIP-FAULT

KW - JAPAN SEA

KW - REMANENCE ANISOTROPY

KW - SOUTHERN-CALIFORNIA

KW - NEW-ZEALAND

KW - ANHYSTERETIC REMANENCE

KW - EXTRUSION TECTONICS

KW - BLOCK ROTATIONS

U2 - 10.1029/2001JB001226

DO - 10.1029/2001JB001226

M3 - Article

VL - 108 (B2)

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - 2066

ER -