Glycaemic index of some commercially available rice and rice products in Great Britain

D V Ranawana, C J K Henry, H J Lightowler, D Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The glycaemic response to nine types of rice (white basmati, brown basmati, white and brown basmati, easy-cook basmati, basmati and wild rice, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice, Thai red rice, Thai glutinous rice) and two types of rice vermicelli (Guilin rice vermicelli, Jiangxi rice vermicelli) commercially available in the United Kingdom were compared against a glucose standard in a non-blind, randomized, repeated-measure, crossover design trial. Fourteen healthy subjects (six males, eight females), mean age 38 (standard deviation 16) years and mean body mass index 21.3 (standard deviation 2.3) kg/m(2), were recruited for the study. Subjects were served portions of the test foods and a standard food (glucose), on separate occasions, each containing 50 g available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose was measured from finger-prick samples in fasted subjects (-5 and 0 min) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the consumption of each test food. For each type of food, its glycaemic index (GI) was calculated geometrically by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose curve as a percentage of each subject's average incremental area under the blood glucose curve for the standard food. The 10 foods exhibited a range of GI values from 37 to 92. The study indicated that rice noodles, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice and white basmati rice were low-GI foods, whilst all of the other foods were medium-GI and high-GI foods. The information presented in this paper may be useful in helping people select low-GI foods from the customary foods consumed by the British and Asian populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-110
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
Volume60
Issue numberSuppl 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

rice products
Glycemic Index
glycemic index
rice
Food
blood glucose
test meals
Blood Glucose
Oryza
United Kingdom
Cross-Over Studies
red rice
glutinous rice
wild rice
glucose
noodles
Glucose
body mass index

Keywords

  • adult
  • blood glucose
  • body mass index
  • chronic disease
  • cross-over studies
  • dietary carbohydrates
  • female
  • flour
  • food handling
  • glycemic index
  • Great Britain
  • humans
  • hyperglycemia
  • male
  • middle aged
  • Oryza sativa
  • species specificity
  • time factors
  • young adult

Cite this

Glycaemic index of some commercially available rice and rice products in Great Britain. / Ranawana, D V; Henry, C J K; Lightowler, H J; Wang, D.

In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Vol. 60, No. Suppl 4, 2009, p. 99-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The glycaemic response to nine types of rice (white basmati, brown basmati, white and brown basmati, easy-cook basmati, basmati and wild rice, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice, Thai red rice, Thai glutinous rice) and two types of rice vermicelli (Guilin rice vermicelli, Jiangxi rice vermicelli) commercially available in the United Kingdom were compared against a glucose standard in a non-blind, randomized, repeated-measure, crossover design trial. Fourteen healthy subjects (six males, eight females), mean age 38 (standard deviation 16) years and mean body mass index 21.3 (standard deviation 2.3) kg/m(2), were recruited for the study. Subjects were served portions of the test foods and a standard food (glucose), on separate occasions, each containing 50 g available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose was measured from finger-prick samples in fasted subjects (-5 and 0 min) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the consumption of each test food. For each type of food, its glycaemic index (GI) was calculated geometrically by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose curve as a percentage of each subject's average incremental area under the blood glucose curve for the standard food. The 10 foods exhibited a range of GI values from 37 to 92. The study indicated that rice noodles, long-grain rice, easy-cook long-grain rice and white basmati rice were low-GI foods, whilst all of the other foods were medium-GI and high-GI foods. The information presented in this paper may be useful in helping people select low-GI foods from the customary foods consumed by the British and Asian populations.

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