God and the Illegal Alien

United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics

Robert Whitaker Heimburger*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book/ReportBook

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Illegal alien: this is what millions of men, women, and children are called under federal United States immigration law. How should Christian ethics respond to illegal immigration? This book tracks the emergence of the concept of the illegal alien in federal United States law, responding with resources from the Christian tradition.

As the alien emerges in medieval English law, where do migrants stand within God’s world? As U.S. Supreme Court Cases responding to Chinese migration make it possible to be an illegal alien, how can authorities govern immigration under God? As legislation enables nationals of neighboring Mexico to be called illegal aliens from the 1960s onward, how can neighbors practice justice and mercy?

A theology of politics points toward answers through readings of biblical passages from Genesis, Deuteronomy, the Psalms, Luke, and 1 Corinthians, read in conversation with Luther, Grotius, Barth, O’Donovan, and more.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationNew York and Cambridge
PublisherCambridge University Press
Number of pages238
ISBN (Electronic)9781316817131
ISBN (Print)9781107176621, 9781316629833
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2018

Publication series

NameLaw and Christianity
PublisherCambridge University Press

Fingerprint

Theology
Deity
Immigration
U.S. Supreme Court
Hugo Grotius
Genesis
Neighbors
Migrants
Mercy
Court Cases
Mexico
Resources
Christian Tradition
Deuteronomy
1960s
English Law
Justice
Psalms
Legislation
Medieval Period

Keywords

  • Immigration
  • Law
  • theological interpretation of Scripture
  • Old Testament
  • Hebrew Bible
  • New Testament
  • Immigration Law
  • Nationhood
  • Immigraiton law
  • Legal history
  • Common law
  • Coke, Edward
  • 1 Corinthians
  • Barth
  • territory
  • Chinese immigration
  • Luther
  • Genesis
  • Psalms
  • Deuteronomy
  • international relations
  • Aristotle
  • Grotius, Hugo
  • Luke
  • Christian ethics
  • Moral theology
  • Hobbes
  • political theology
  • Distributive justice
  • Corrective justice
  • Attributive justice
  • US-Mexico borderlands
  • Migration
  • Theology

Cite this

God and the Illegal Alien : United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics. / Heimburger, Robert Whitaker.

New York and Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2018. 238 p. (Law and Christianity).

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Heimburger RW. God and the Illegal Alien: United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics. New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 238 p. (Law and Christianity). https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316817131
Heimburger, Robert Whitaker. / God and the Illegal Alien : United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics. New York and Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2018. 238 p. (Law and Christianity).
@book{9ab627d725474202b87f9e926acc6775,
title = "God and the Illegal Alien: United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics",
abstract = "Illegal alien: this is what millions of men, women, and children are called under federal United States immigration law. How should Christian ethics respond to illegal immigration? This book tracks the emergence of the concept of the illegal alien in federal United States law, responding with resources from the Christian tradition. As the alien emerges in medieval English law, where do migrants stand within God’s world? As U.S. Supreme Court Cases responding to Chinese migration make it possible to be an illegal alien, how can authorities govern immigration under God? As legislation enables nationals of neighboring Mexico to be called illegal aliens from the 1960s onward, how can neighbors practice justice and mercy? A theology of politics points toward answers through readings of biblical passages from Genesis, Deuteronomy, the Psalms, Luke, and 1 Corinthians, read in conversation with Luther, Grotius, Barth, O’Donovan, and more.",
keywords = "Immigration, Law, theological interpretation of Scripture, Old Testament, Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Immigration Law, Nationhood, Immigraiton law, Legal history, Common law, Coke, Edward, 1 Corinthians, Barth, territory, Chinese immigration, Luther, Genesis, Psalms, Deuteronomy, international relations, Aristotle, Grotius, Hugo, Luke, Christian ethics, Moral theology, Hobbes, political theology, Distributive justice, Corrective justice, Attributive justice, US-Mexico borderlands, Migration, Theology",
author = "Heimburger, {Robert Whitaker}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1017/9781316817131",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781107176621",
series = "Law and Christianity",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - BOOK

T1 - God and the Illegal Alien

T2 - United States Immigration Law and a Theology of Politics

AU - Heimburger, Robert Whitaker

PY - 2018/1/31

Y1 - 2018/1/31

N2 - Illegal alien: this is what millions of men, women, and children are called under federal United States immigration law. How should Christian ethics respond to illegal immigration? This book tracks the emergence of the concept of the illegal alien in federal United States law, responding with resources from the Christian tradition. As the alien emerges in medieval English law, where do migrants stand within God’s world? As U.S. Supreme Court Cases responding to Chinese migration make it possible to be an illegal alien, how can authorities govern immigration under God? As legislation enables nationals of neighboring Mexico to be called illegal aliens from the 1960s onward, how can neighbors practice justice and mercy? A theology of politics points toward answers through readings of biblical passages from Genesis, Deuteronomy, the Psalms, Luke, and 1 Corinthians, read in conversation with Luther, Grotius, Barth, O’Donovan, and more.

AB - Illegal alien: this is what millions of men, women, and children are called under federal United States immigration law. How should Christian ethics respond to illegal immigration? This book tracks the emergence of the concept of the illegal alien in federal United States law, responding with resources from the Christian tradition. As the alien emerges in medieval English law, where do migrants stand within God’s world? As U.S. Supreme Court Cases responding to Chinese migration make it possible to be an illegal alien, how can authorities govern immigration under God? As legislation enables nationals of neighboring Mexico to be called illegal aliens from the 1960s onward, how can neighbors practice justice and mercy? A theology of politics points toward answers through readings of biblical passages from Genesis, Deuteronomy, the Psalms, Luke, and 1 Corinthians, read in conversation with Luther, Grotius, Barth, O’Donovan, and more.

KW - Immigration

KW - Law

KW - theological interpretation of Scripture

KW - Old Testament

KW - Hebrew Bible

KW - New Testament

KW - Immigration Law

KW - Nationhood

KW - Immigraiton law

KW - Legal history

KW - Common law

KW - Coke, Edward

KW - 1 Corinthians

KW - Barth

KW - territory

KW - Chinese immigration

KW - Luther

KW - Genesis

KW - Psalms

KW - Deuteronomy

KW - international relations

KW - Aristotle

KW - Grotius, Hugo

KW - Luke

KW - Christian ethics

KW - Moral theology

KW - Hobbes

KW - political theology

KW - Distributive justice

KW - Corrective justice

KW - Attributive justice

KW - US-Mexico borderlands

KW - Migration

KW - Theology

UR - https://www.academia.edu/38147902/How_Nationals_of_Neighboring_Countries_Became_Illegal_Aliens_

U2 - 10.1017/9781316817131

DO - 10.1017/9781316817131

M3 - Book

SN - 9781107176621

SN - 9781316629833

T3 - Law and Christianity

BT - God and the Illegal Alien

PB - Cambridge University Press

CY - New York and Cambridge

ER -