GPR55

a new member of the cannabinoid receptor clan?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Ryberg et al. present convincing in vitro evidence that the orphan GPCR, GPR55, is a cannabinoid receptor. GPR55 was activated by a range of plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids and blocked by the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol. Their experiments have revealed several differences between the pharmacology of GPR55 and the established cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. For example, the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, activated GPR55 and the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, displayed greater efficacy at GPR55 than at CB1 or CB2 receptors. They also compared the distribution of GPR55 and CB1 mRNA in mouse and report that GPR55 couples to G alpha(13), that it is activated by virodhamine, palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide, and that virodhamine displays relatively high efficacy as a GPR55 agonist. Still to be identified are the main roles played by GPR55 in health and disease and any potential therapeutic benefits of activating or blocking this receptor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)984-986
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume152
Issue number7
Early online date17 Sep 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Keywords

  • gPR55
  • cannabinoid receptors
  • cannabis
  • Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol
  • cannabidiol
  • anandamide
  • 2-arachidonoylglycerol
  • AM251
  • virodhamine
  • palmitoylethanolamide
  • pharmacology
  • brain
  • binds

Cite this

GPR55 : a new member of the cannabinoid receptor clan? / Pertwee, R. G.

In: British Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 152, No. 7, 12.2007, p. 984-986.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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title = "GPR55: a new member of the cannabinoid receptor clan?",
abstract = "In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Ryberg et al. present convincing in vitro evidence that the orphan GPCR, GPR55, is a cannabinoid receptor. GPR55 was activated by a range of plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids and blocked by the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol. Their experiments have revealed several differences between the pharmacology of GPR55 and the established cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. For example, the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, activated GPR55 and the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, displayed greater efficacy at GPR55 than at CB1 or CB2 receptors. They also compared the distribution of GPR55 and CB1 mRNA in mouse and report that GPR55 couples to G alpha(13), that it is activated by virodhamine, palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide, and that virodhamine displays relatively high efficacy as a GPR55 agonist. Still to be identified are the main roles played by GPR55 in health and disease and any potential therapeutic benefits of activating or blocking this receptor.",
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AB - In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Ryberg et al. present convincing in vitro evidence that the orphan GPCR, GPR55, is a cannabinoid receptor. GPR55 was activated by a range of plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids and blocked by the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol. Their experiments have revealed several differences between the pharmacology of GPR55 and the established cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. For example, the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, activated GPR55 and the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, displayed greater efficacy at GPR55 than at CB1 or CB2 receptors. They also compared the distribution of GPR55 and CB1 mRNA in mouse and report that GPR55 couples to G alpha(13), that it is activated by virodhamine, palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide, and that virodhamine displays relatively high efficacy as a GPR55 agonist. Still to be identified are the main roles played by GPR55 in health and disease and any potential therapeutic benefits of activating or blocking this receptor.

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