Greenspace matters

exploring links between greenspace, gender and well-being with conservation volunteers

Margaret Currie, Petra Lackova, Elisabeth Dinnie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our study aimed to increase understanding of the effect of gender on mediating engagement with greenspace, currently poorly understood. We engaged with a group of conservation volunteers in a Scottish city to explore how men and women benefit from and interact with greenspace in a deprived area. We found that interactions with the greenspace have multiple health and well-being benefits and that differences in engagement (and therefore potentially in any well-being benefits accrued) can be identified between men and women in terms of: motivations for getting involved with the group (e.g., men got involved for something to do whilst women sought to pursue conservation experience), connections volunteers made being in the group (e.g., men were more likely to value the social connections they made in the group than women) and finally, and potentially most importantly, the greenspace being valued for being a ‘neutral space’ where volunteers (especially men) felt more at ease and equal than in other places. This research enhances understanding of the ways in which benefits from engagement with greenspace are mediated through social factors such as gender and volunteering. Such research is important to planners and policy-makers in understanding how greenspace use can be encouraged for different genders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)641-651
Number of pages11
JournalLandscape Research
Volume41
Issue number6
Early online date12 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

greenspace
gender
conservation
well-being
Group
social factors
interaction
health
woman
Values
experience

Keywords

  • greenspace
  • health and well-being
  • gender
  • deprivation
  • conservation volunteers
  • qualitative research

Cite this

Greenspace matters : exploring links between greenspace, gender and well-being with conservation volunteers. / Currie, Margaret ; Lackova, Petra; Dinnie, Elisabeth.

In: Landscape Research, Vol. 41, No. 6, 2016, p. 641-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Currie, Margaret ; Lackova, Petra ; Dinnie, Elisabeth. / Greenspace matters : exploring links between greenspace, gender and well-being with conservation volunteers. In: Landscape Research. 2016 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 641-651.
@article{83ba0d7a6c9c418d96ca92f7b251fa97,
title = "Greenspace matters: exploring links between greenspace, gender and well-being with conservation volunteers",
abstract = "Our study aimed to increase understanding of the effect of gender on mediating engagement with greenspace, currently poorly understood. We engaged with a group of conservation volunteers in a Scottish city to explore how men and women benefit from and interact with greenspace in a deprived area. We found that interactions with the greenspace have multiple health and well-being benefits and that differences in engagement (and therefore potentially in any well-being benefits accrued) can be identified between men and women in terms of: motivations for getting involved with the group (e.g., men got involved for something to do whilst women sought to pursue conservation experience), connections volunteers made being in the group (e.g., men were more likely to value the social connections they made in the group than women) and finally, and potentially most importantly, the greenspace being valued for being a ‘neutral space’ where volunteers (especially men) felt more at ease and equal than in other places. This research enhances understanding of the ways in which benefits from engagement with greenspace are mediated through social factors such as gender and volunteering. Such research is important to planners and policy-makers in understanding how greenspace use can be encouraged for different genders.",
keywords = "greenspace, health and well-being, gender , deprivation, conservation volunteers, qualitative research",
author = "Margaret Currie and Petra Lackova and Elisabeth Dinnie",
note = "This work was supported by the Rural & Environment Science & Analytical Services Division of the Scottish Government, but the opinions are those of the authors",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/01426397.2016.1208813",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "641--651",
journal = "Landscape Research",
issn = "0142-6397",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Greenspace matters

T2 - exploring links between greenspace, gender and well-being with conservation volunteers

AU - Currie, Margaret

AU - Lackova, Petra

AU - Dinnie, Elisabeth

N1 - This work was supported by the Rural & Environment Science & Analytical Services Division of the Scottish Government, but the opinions are those of the authors

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Our study aimed to increase understanding of the effect of gender on mediating engagement with greenspace, currently poorly understood. We engaged with a group of conservation volunteers in a Scottish city to explore how men and women benefit from and interact with greenspace in a deprived area. We found that interactions with the greenspace have multiple health and well-being benefits and that differences in engagement (and therefore potentially in any well-being benefits accrued) can be identified between men and women in terms of: motivations for getting involved with the group (e.g., men got involved for something to do whilst women sought to pursue conservation experience), connections volunteers made being in the group (e.g., men were more likely to value the social connections they made in the group than women) and finally, and potentially most importantly, the greenspace being valued for being a ‘neutral space’ where volunteers (especially men) felt more at ease and equal than in other places. This research enhances understanding of the ways in which benefits from engagement with greenspace are mediated through social factors such as gender and volunteering. Such research is important to planners and policy-makers in understanding how greenspace use can be encouraged for different genders.

AB - Our study aimed to increase understanding of the effect of gender on mediating engagement with greenspace, currently poorly understood. We engaged with a group of conservation volunteers in a Scottish city to explore how men and women benefit from and interact with greenspace in a deprived area. We found that interactions with the greenspace have multiple health and well-being benefits and that differences in engagement (and therefore potentially in any well-being benefits accrued) can be identified between men and women in terms of: motivations for getting involved with the group (e.g., men got involved for something to do whilst women sought to pursue conservation experience), connections volunteers made being in the group (e.g., men were more likely to value the social connections they made in the group than women) and finally, and potentially most importantly, the greenspace being valued for being a ‘neutral space’ where volunteers (especially men) felt more at ease and equal than in other places. This research enhances understanding of the ways in which benefits from engagement with greenspace are mediated through social factors such as gender and volunteering. Such research is important to planners and policy-makers in understanding how greenspace use can be encouraged for different genders.

KW - greenspace

KW - health and well-being

KW - gender

KW - deprivation

KW - conservation volunteers

KW - qualitative research

U2 - 10.1080/01426397.2016.1208813

DO - 10.1080/01426397.2016.1208813

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 641

EP - 651

JO - Landscape Research

JF - Landscape Research

SN - 0142-6397

IS - 6

ER -