How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India

Bharati Sharma, KV Ramani, Dileep Mavalankar, Lovney Kanguru, Julia Hussein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Objective
To investigate how Appreciative Inquiry (AI) influenced infection control practices. This study was a part of a larger interrupted time series study.

Methods
AI, an organisational change agent focuses on positive aspects (what is done well). During the intervention, all cadres of hospital personnel were brought together to share their experiences of saving women’s lives during childbirth. They agreed on do-able action plans for improving infection control in their hospitals. Between three and six months after the intervention, 31 in-depth interviews were conducted and observation checklists used to investigate the perceived influence of AI on clinical practices, human resource management and work culture.

Results
AI was perceived as having a positive influence on team relationships; improving communication across the power hierarchy of hospitals; fostering trust and cooperation with inclusion of the marginalized and non-technical staff in the team; and developing better understanding of one’s own role and those of the others. The intervention did not lead to changes in human resource policies, financial and information systems or leadership and governance. Pre-existing factors such as power and autonomy of leaders, the leader’s motivation for change, leadership styles and a background of organizational reform such as accreditation influenced the AI process.

Conclusions
AI can lead to changes in infection control practices in hospitals. AI meetings serve as a forum for team building, shared decision making, problem solving, capacity building and a means for developing a shared ideology and values for service delivery, thereby setting-up an organisational ‘work culture’. Reforms such as accreditation appear to put organizations into a receptive, high alert, active mode.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlobal Women's Research Conference (GLOW)
PublisherUniversity of Birmingham
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2013
EventGlobal Women's Research Conference (GLOW) - University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Nov 20131 Nov 2013

Conference

ConferenceGlobal Women's Research Conference (GLOW)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period1/11/131/11/13

Fingerprint

Appreciative inquiry
India
Maternity care
Infection
Qualitative study
Carework
Accreditation
Organizational change
Human resource policies
Financial system
Factors
Service delivery
Human resource management practices
Childbirth
Team building
Shared decision making
Governance
Capacity building
Check list
Ideology

Cite this

Sharma, B., Ramani, KV., Mavalankar, D., Kanguru, L., & Hussein, J. (2013). How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India. In Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW) University of Birmingham.

How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India. / Sharma, Bharati ; Ramani, KV; Mavalankar, Dileep; Kanguru, Lovney; Hussein, Julia.

Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW). University of Birmingham, 2013.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sharma, B, Ramani, KV, Mavalankar, D, Kanguru, L & Hussein, J 2013, How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India. in Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW). University of Birmingham, Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW), Birmingham, United Kingdom, 1/11/13.
Sharma B, Ramani KV, Mavalankar D, Kanguru L, Hussein J. How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India. In Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW). University of Birmingham. 2013
Sharma, Bharati ; Ramani, KV ; Mavalankar, Dileep ; Kanguru, Lovney ; Hussein, Julia. / How did an ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ intervention to improve infection control in maternity care work? A qualitative study in India. Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW). University of Birmingham, 2013.
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abstract = "ObjectiveTo investigate how Appreciative Inquiry (AI) influenced infection control practices. This study was a part of a larger interrupted time series study.MethodsAI, an organisational change agent focuses on positive aspects (what is done well). During the intervention, all cadres of hospital personnel were brought together to share their experiences of saving women’s lives during childbirth. They agreed on do-able action plans for improving infection control in their hospitals. Between three and six months after the intervention, 31 in-depth interviews were conducted and observation checklists used to investigate the perceived influence of AI on clinical practices, human resource management and work culture. ResultsAI was perceived as having a positive influence on team relationships; improving communication across the power hierarchy of hospitals; fostering trust and cooperation with inclusion of the marginalized and non-technical staff in the team; and developing better understanding of one’s own role and those of the others. The intervention did not lead to changes in human resource policies, financial and information systems or leadership and governance. Pre-existing factors such as power and autonomy of leaders, the leader’s motivation for change, leadership styles and a background of organizational reform such as accreditation influenced the AI process.ConclusionsAI can lead to changes in infection control practices in hospitals. AI meetings serve as a forum for team building, shared decision making, problem solving, capacity building and a means for developing a shared ideology and values for service delivery, thereby setting-up an organisational ‘work culture’. Reforms such as accreditation appear to put organizations into a receptive, high alert, active mode.",
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N2 - ObjectiveTo investigate how Appreciative Inquiry (AI) influenced infection control practices. This study was a part of a larger interrupted time series study.MethodsAI, an organisational change agent focuses on positive aspects (what is done well). During the intervention, all cadres of hospital personnel were brought together to share their experiences of saving women’s lives during childbirth. They agreed on do-able action plans for improving infection control in their hospitals. Between three and six months after the intervention, 31 in-depth interviews were conducted and observation checklists used to investigate the perceived influence of AI on clinical practices, human resource management and work culture. ResultsAI was perceived as having a positive influence on team relationships; improving communication across the power hierarchy of hospitals; fostering trust and cooperation with inclusion of the marginalized and non-technical staff in the team; and developing better understanding of one’s own role and those of the others. The intervention did not lead to changes in human resource policies, financial and information systems or leadership and governance. Pre-existing factors such as power and autonomy of leaders, the leader’s motivation for change, leadership styles and a background of organizational reform such as accreditation influenced the AI process.ConclusionsAI can lead to changes in infection control practices in hospitals. AI meetings serve as a forum for team building, shared decision making, problem solving, capacity building and a means for developing a shared ideology and values for service delivery, thereby setting-up an organisational ‘work culture’. Reforms such as accreditation appear to put organizations into a receptive, high alert, active mode.

AB - ObjectiveTo investigate how Appreciative Inquiry (AI) influenced infection control practices. This study was a part of a larger interrupted time series study.MethodsAI, an organisational change agent focuses on positive aspects (what is done well). During the intervention, all cadres of hospital personnel were brought together to share their experiences of saving women’s lives during childbirth. They agreed on do-able action plans for improving infection control in their hospitals. Between three and six months after the intervention, 31 in-depth interviews were conducted and observation checklists used to investigate the perceived influence of AI on clinical practices, human resource management and work culture. ResultsAI was perceived as having a positive influence on team relationships; improving communication across the power hierarchy of hospitals; fostering trust and cooperation with inclusion of the marginalized and non-technical staff in the team; and developing better understanding of one’s own role and those of the others. The intervention did not lead to changes in human resource policies, financial and information systems or leadership and governance. Pre-existing factors such as power and autonomy of leaders, the leader’s motivation for change, leadership styles and a background of organizational reform such as accreditation influenced the AI process.ConclusionsAI can lead to changes in infection control practices in hospitals. AI meetings serve as a forum for team building, shared decision making, problem solving, capacity building and a means for developing a shared ideology and values for service delivery, thereby setting-up an organisational ‘work culture’. Reforms such as accreditation appear to put organizations into a receptive, high alert, active mode.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Global Women's Research Conference (GLOW)

PB - University of Birmingham

ER -