How do plants regulate the function, community structure and diversity of mycorrhizal fungi?

David Johnson, M. IJdo, David R Genney, Ian C Anderson, Ian James Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In many semi-natural and natural ecosystems, mycorrhizal fungi are the most abundant and functionally important group of soil micro-organisms. They are almost wholly dependent on their host plants to supply them with photosynthate in return for which they enable the plant to access greater quantities of nutrients. Thus, there is considerable potential for plant communities to regulate the structure and function of mycorrhizal communities. This paper reviews some of the key recent developments that have enabled the influence of plant species richness, composition, and age on mycorrhizal communities in boreal forests and temperate grassland to be determined. It discusses the emerging evidence that, in some situations, plant species richness is related to mycorrhizal species richness, in contrast to previous thinking. The paper also includes some preliminary data on the effect of host stand age on root-associated basidiomycete communities. It concludes by highlighting some of the new methodological advances that promise to unravel the linkages between mycorrhizal diversity and their function in situ.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1751-1760
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume56
Issue number417
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • C-13
  • C-14
  • carbon cycling
  • ectomycorrhiza
  • plant species diversity
  • stable isotope probing
  • PINUS-SYLVESTRIS L.
  • PSEUDOTSUGA-MENZIESII
  • ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI
  • MOLECULAR DIVERSITY
  • UPLAND GRASSLAND
  • HOST-SPECIFICITY
  • TROPICAL FOREST
  • SOIL
  • PATTERNS
  • PRODUCTIVITY

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