How Prioritized is Self-Prioritization During Stimulus Processing?

Johanna K Falben (Corresponding Author), Marius Golubickis, Ruta Balseryte, Linn M. Persson, Dimitra Tsamadi, Siobhan E. Caughey, C. Neil MacRae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has suggested that self-relevance automatically enhances stimulus processing (i.e., the self-prioritization effect). Notably, information associated with one’s self elicits faster responses than comparable material associated with other targets (e.g., friend, stranger). Challenging the assertion that self-prioritization is an obligatory process, here we hypothesized that self-relevance only facilitates performance when task sets draw attention to previously formed target-object associations. The results of two experiments were consistent with this viewpoint. Compared with arbitrary objects owned by a friend, those owned by the self were classified more rapidly when participants were required to report either the owner or identity of the items (i.e., semantic task set). In contrast, self-relevance failed to facilitate performance when participants judged the orientation of the stimuli (i.e., perceptual task set). These findings demonstrate the conditional automaticity of self-prioritization during stimulus processing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalVisual Cognition
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date1 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Task Performance and Analysis
Semantics
Research
Stimulus
Automaticity
Experiment
Stranger

Keywords

  • self-relevance
  • self-prioritization
  • ownership
  • automaticity
  • task sets
  • Self-relevance
  • responses
  • social salience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

How Prioritized is Self-Prioritization During Stimulus Processing? / Falben, Johanna K (Corresponding Author); Golubickis, Marius; Balseryte, Ruta; Persson, Linn M.; Tsamadi, Dimitra; Caughey, Siobhan E.; MacRae, C. Neil.

In: Visual Cognition, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2019, p. 46-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Falben, JK, Golubickis, M, Balseryte, R, Persson, LM, Tsamadi, D, Caughey, SE & MacRae, CN 2019, 'How Prioritized is Self-Prioritization During Stimulus Processing?', Visual Cognition, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 46-51. https://doi.org/10.1080/13506285.2019.1583708
Falben, Johanna K ; Golubickis, Marius ; Balseryte, Ruta ; Persson, Linn M. ; Tsamadi, Dimitra ; Caughey, Siobhan E. ; MacRae, C. Neil. / How Prioritized is Self-Prioritization During Stimulus Processing?. In: Visual Cognition. 2019 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 46-51.
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