Human elements and the pragmatic approach in the Australian, Scottish and Swedish standards for newly qualified teachers

Goran Fransson, Andrea Gallant, Rachel Shanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Teacher standards are used in many countries, but it has been argued that there is a disconnection between the standards and teachers’ everyday practices. Mega-narratives about teachers’ practices have been recognised as powerful for educational change and when implementing and legitimising standards. In this comparative study, the standards for newly qualified teachers in Australia, Scotland and Sweden are analysed in order to determine the extent to which they contain human elements, here framed as contextual professionalism, and/or paradigmatic knowledge (Olson and Craig in Teach Coll Rec 111(2):547–572, 2009a). This comparison facilitates an exploration of how teachers’ work is envisaged in the respective countries and what is expected or required from newly qualified teachers. The results indicate that the Australian and Scottish standards emphasise paradigmatic knowledge in teaching, whereas the now abandoned Swedish standards emphasise contextual professionalism in teaching.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-267
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Educational Change
Volume19
Issue number2
Early online date12 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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pragmatics
teacher
Teaching
Sweden
narrative
professionalism

Keywords

  • Comparative research
  • Educational change
  • Mega-narrative
  • Newly qualified teachers
  • Policy borrowing
  • Teacher standards

Cite this

Human elements and the pragmatic approach in the Australian, Scottish and Swedish standards for newly qualified teachers. / Fransson, Goran; Gallant, Andrea; Shanks, Rachel.

In: Journal of Educational Change, Vol. 19, No. 2, 05.2018, p. 243-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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