I don't think I'm the right person for that: Theoretical and pedagogical questions about combined credential programs

Kathryn S Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This qualitative study explores the relationship between state licensure and preservice teachers' pedagogical and theoretical boundaries pertaining to elementary education, mild/moderate disabilities, and moderate/severe disabilities. It uses data from interviews with 18 preservice teachers after one year in a combined (elementary and special education) credential program. Findings indicate views about the students preservice teachers are willing to teach relate to concerns about control over disabled bodies, pity about the perceived limitations of disabled students, and issues of teacher and student responsibility. These findings map onto state level divisions in teacher credentialing. The findings in this paper lead to implication for teacher preparation, policy development and hopes for inclusive practices.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDisability Studies Quarterly
Volume28
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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human being
teacher
elementary education
severe disability
special education
student teacher
development policy
student
disability
responsibility
interview

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I don't think I'm the right person for that : Theoretical and pedagogical questions about combined credential programs. / Young, Kathryn S.

In: Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 4, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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