Identifying Persons with Axial Spondyloarthritis At Risk of Poor Work Outcome: Results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

Gary J. Macfarlane (Corresponding Author), Joanna Shim, Gareth T. Jones, Karen Walker-Bone, Ejaz Pathan, Linda E. Dean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Firstly to test the hypothesis that, amongst working patients with axSpA, those who report issues with reduced productivity at work (presenteeism)
are at higher risk of work absence (absenteeism), and patients who report absenteeism are at higher risk of subsequently of leaving the workforce. Secondly to identify characteristics of workers at high risk of poor work outcome.
Methods: The British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register in Ankylosing Spondylitis has recruited patients meeting ASAS criteria for axSpA from eighty-three centres. Data collection involves clinical and patient reported measures at recruitment and annually thereafter, including the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment scale. Generalised Estimating Equations were used to identify factors associated with poor work outcomes.
Results: Of the 1188 participants in this analysis who were working at recruitment, 79% reported some presenteeism and 19% some absenteeism in the past week due to their axSpA. Leaving employment was most strongly associated with previous absenteeism (Risk Ratio 1.02per % increase in absenteeism, 95% CI
1.01, 1.03) which itself was most strongly associated with previous presenteeism, a labour intensive job and peripheral joint involvement. High disease activity, fatigue, a labour intensive job and poorer physical function were all independently associated with future presenteeism.
Conclusion: Clinical and patient reported factors along with aspects of work are associated with an increased risk of axSpA patients having a poor outcome in relation to work. This study has identified modifiable factors as targets, facilitating patients with axSpA to remain productive in work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-152
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume46
Issue number2
Early online date1 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Biological Products
Absenteeism
Efficiency
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Fatigue
Joints
Odds Ratio
Presenteeism

Keywords

  • Spondyloarthritis
  • work
  • absenteeism
  • presenteeism
  • cohort
  • epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

@article{b3b630f4f1c342acb3bb4e148bd5900f,
title = "Identifying Persons with Axial Spondyloarthritis At Risk of Poor Work Outcome: Results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register",
abstract = "Objective: Firstly to test the hypothesis that, amongst working patients with axSpA, those who report issues with reduced productivity at work (presenteeism) are at higher risk of work absence (absenteeism), and patients who report absenteeism are at higher risk of subsequently of leaving the workforce. Secondly to identify characteristics of workers at high risk of poor work outcome. Methods: The British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register in Ankylosing Spondylitis has recruited patients meeting ASAS criteria for axSpA from eighty-three centres. Data collection involves clinical and patient reported measures at recruitment and annually thereafter, including the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment scale. Generalised Estimating Equations were used to identify factors associated with poor work outcomes.Results: Of the 1188 participants in this analysis who were working at recruitment, 79{\%} reported some presenteeism and 19{\%} some absenteeism in the past week due to their axSpA. Leaving employment was most strongly associated with previous absenteeism (Risk Ratio 1.02per {\%} increase in absenteeism, 95{\%} CI1.01, 1.03) which itself was most strongly associated with previous presenteeism, a labour intensive job and peripheral joint involvement. High disease activity, fatigue, a labour intensive job and poorer physical function were all independently associated with future presenteeism. Conclusion: Clinical and patient reported factors along with aspects of work are associated with an increased risk of axSpA patients having a poor outcome in relation to work. This study has identified modifiable factors as targets, facilitating patients with axSpA to remain productive in work.",
keywords = "Spondyloarthritis, work, absenteeism, presenteeism, cohort, epidemiology",
author = "Macfarlane, {Gary J.} and Joanna Shim and Jones, {Gareth T.} and Karen Walker-Bone and Ejaz Pathan and Dean, {Linda E.}",
note = "MRC/Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work (grant no: 20665 CI KW-B). The BSRBR-AS is funded by the British Society for Rheumatology who have received funding for this from Pfizer, AbbVie and UCB. These companies receive advance copies of manuscripts for comments. They have no input in determining the topics for analysis or work involved in undertaking it.",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.3899/jrheum.180477",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "145--152",
journal = "Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0315-162X",
publisher = "Journal of Rheumatology",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying Persons with Axial Spondyloarthritis At Risk of Poor Work Outcome

T2 - Results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

AU - Macfarlane, Gary J.

AU - Shim, Joanna

AU - Jones, Gareth T.

AU - Walker-Bone, Karen

AU - Pathan, Ejaz

AU - Dean, Linda E.

N1 - MRC/Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work (grant no: 20665 CI KW-B). The BSRBR-AS is funded by the British Society for Rheumatology who have received funding for this from Pfizer, AbbVie and UCB. These companies receive advance copies of manuscripts for comments. They have no input in determining the topics for analysis or work involved in undertaking it.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Objective: Firstly to test the hypothesis that, amongst working patients with axSpA, those who report issues with reduced productivity at work (presenteeism) are at higher risk of work absence (absenteeism), and patients who report absenteeism are at higher risk of subsequently of leaving the workforce. Secondly to identify characteristics of workers at high risk of poor work outcome. Methods: The British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register in Ankylosing Spondylitis has recruited patients meeting ASAS criteria for axSpA from eighty-three centres. Data collection involves clinical and patient reported measures at recruitment and annually thereafter, including the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment scale. Generalised Estimating Equations were used to identify factors associated with poor work outcomes.Results: Of the 1188 participants in this analysis who were working at recruitment, 79% reported some presenteeism and 19% some absenteeism in the past week due to their axSpA. Leaving employment was most strongly associated with previous absenteeism (Risk Ratio 1.02per % increase in absenteeism, 95% CI1.01, 1.03) which itself was most strongly associated with previous presenteeism, a labour intensive job and peripheral joint involvement. High disease activity, fatigue, a labour intensive job and poorer physical function were all independently associated with future presenteeism. Conclusion: Clinical and patient reported factors along with aspects of work are associated with an increased risk of axSpA patients having a poor outcome in relation to work. This study has identified modifiable factors as targets, facilitating patients with axSpA to remain productive in work.

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