Ignorance about Chlamydia among sexually active women - a two centre study

S Macmillan, R Walker, E Oloto, A Fitzmaurice, A Templeton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis is the micro-organism causing the most common sexually transmitted disease in the UK and Europe, The majority of female infections are asymptomatic and recognized sequelae include pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Over 1200 sexually active women from two urban centres in the UK were questioned about awareness and knowledge of Chlamydia genito-urinary infection. Awareness was poor, as half of the study population had never heard of Chlamydia, Overall, less than one-quarter demonstrated adequate knowledge regarding transmission, immunity, symptoms, and sequelae, Better knowledge was found in women over the age of 25 years, in those cohabiting, in those with a professional/management occupation, and in those attending family planning clinics, The Chief Medical Officer's Expert Advisory Group on Chlamydia (1998) has recommended opportunistic screening of asymptomatic sexually active women in the UK, This study gives insight into the considerable task facing the Department of Health, as only an informed public will take up the offer of Screening, Research is urgently needed to assess the impact of different approaches to education regarding sexually transmitted infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1131-1135
Number of pages5
JournalHuman Reproduction Update
Volume14
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • health education
  • sexually transmitted disease
  • HIGH-SCHOOL-STUDENTS
  • TRANSMITTED DISEASES
  • KNOWLEDGE
  • TRACHOMATIS
  • BEHAVIOR
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • INFERTILITY
  • INFORMATION
  • INFECTIONS
  • GIRLS

Cite this

Macmillan, S., Walker, R., Oloto, E., Fitzmaurice, A., & Templeton, A. (1999). Ignorance about Chlamydia among sexually active women - a two centre study. Human Reproduction Update, 14, 1131-1135.

Ignorance about Chlamydia among sexually active women - a two centre study. / Macmillan, S ; Walker, R ; Oloto, E ; Fitzmaurice, A ; Templeton, A .

In: Human Reproduction Update, Vol. 14, 1999, p. 1131-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Macmillan, S, Walker, R, Oloto, E, Fitzmaurice, A & Templeton, A 1999, 'Ignorance about Chlamydia among sexually active women - a two centre study', Human Reproduction Update, vol. 14, pp. 1131-1135.
Macmillan, S ; Walker, R ; Oloto, E ; Fitzmaurice, A ; Templeton, A . / Ignorance about Chlamydia among sexually active women - a two centre study. In: Human Reproduction Update. 1999 ; Vol. 14. pp. 1131-1135.
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