Impacts of natural factors and farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions in the North China Plain

A meta-analysis

Cong Xu, Xiao Han, Roland Bol, Pete Smith, Wenliang Wu, Fanqiao Meng*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Requirements for mitigation of the continued increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are much needed for the North China Plain (NCP). We conducted a meta-analysis of 76 published studies of 24 sites in the NCP to examine the effects of natural conditions and farming practices on GHG emissions in that region. We found that N2O was the main component of the area-scaled total GHG balance, and the CH4 contribution was <5%. Precipitation, temperature, soil pH, and texture had no significant impacts on annual GHG emissions, because of limited variation of these factors in the NCP. The N2O emissions increased exponentially with mineral fertilizer N application rate, with y = 0.2389e0.0058x for wheat season and y = 0.365e0.0071x for maize season. Emission factors were estimated at 0.37% for wheat and 0.90% for maize at conventional fertilizer N application rates. The agronomic optimal N rates (241 and 185 kg N ha−1 for wheat and maize, respectively) exhibited great potential for reducing N2O emissions, by 0.39 (29%) and 1.71 (56%) kg N2O-N ha−1 season−1 for the wheat and maize seasons, respectively. Mixed application of organic manure with reduced mineral fertilizer N could reduce annual N2O emissions by 16% relative to mineral N application alone while maintaining a high crop yield. Compared with conventional tillage, no-tillage significantly reduced N2O emissions by ~30% in the wheat season, whereas it increased those emissions by ~10% in the maize season. This may have resulted from the lower soil temperature in winter and increased soil moisture in summer under no-tillage practice. Straw incorporation significantly increased annual N2O emissions, by 26% relative to straw removal. Our analysis indicates that these farming practices could be further tested to mitigate GHG emission and maintain high crop yields in the NCP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6702-6715
Number of pages14
JournalEcology and Evolution
Volume7
Issue number17
Early online date21 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Fingerprint

meta-analysis
greenhouse gas emissions
nitrous oxide
greenhouse gas
farming systems
China
wheat
corn
maize
mineral fertilizers
application rate
no-tillage
crop yield
straw
fertilizer
zero tillage
emissions factor
soil temperature
greenhouse gases
soil texture

Keywords

  • farming practice
  • fertilizer
  • meta-analysis
  • methane
  • natural factor
  • nitrous oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Impacts of natural factors and farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions in the North China Plain : A meta-analysis. / Xu, Cong; Han, Xiao; Bol, Roland; Smith, Pete; Wu, Wenliang; Meng, Fanqiao.

In: Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 7, No. 17, 09.2017, p. 6702-6715.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, Cong ; Han, Xiao ; Bol, Roland ; Smith, Pete ; Wu, Wenliang ; Meng, Fanqiao. / Impacts of natural factors and farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions in the North China Plain : A meta-analysis. In: Ecology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 17. pp. 6702-6715.
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