Improving the referral process for familial breast cancer genetic counselling: findings of three randomised controlled trials of two interventions - Introduction

B J Wilson, N Torrance, J Mollison, S Wordsworth, J R Gray, N E Haites, A Grant, M K Campbell, Z Miedyzbrodzka, A Clarke, M S Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

Abstract

The current organisation of specialist genetics services within the NHS reflects their historical evolution. They have developed from academic departments to regional centres, each of which serves a number of smaller districts and usually has integrated clinical and laboratory services.(1) Until the late 1980s, UK genetics services were concerned in the main with the diagnosis of fairly uncommon congenital and inherited disorders, and counselling generally concerned reproductive issues.(2) For many years, genetic counselling has been provided almost exclusively by physicians, with the introduction of genetic counsellors or associates with a science or nursing background a fairly recent development.(3,4) Clinical genetics services have therefore had limited capacity to deal with the increasing demand which resulted from the rapid expansion of molecular genetics knowledge.(2) New ways of dealing with patient demand have been suggested; for example, an increased role for GPs,(2,5-7) supported by guidelines(8) and computer support aids,(9,10) the introduction of intermediate levels of specialist advice(2,11) and an enhanced role for nurses.(2-4,12)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1
Number of pages130
JournalHealth Technology Assessment
Volume9
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • SOUTH-EAST SCOTLAND
  • EVIDENCE BASED GUIDELINES
  • DECISION-SUPPORT SYSTEMS
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • GENERAL-PRACTITIONERS
  • NURSE-PRACTITIONERS
  • OVARIAN-CANCER
  • BREAST/OVARIAN CANCER
  • HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT

Cite this

Improving the referral process for familial breast cancer genetic counselling: findings of three randomised controlled trials of two interventions - Introduction. / Wilson, B J ; Torrance, N ; Mollison, J ; Wordsworth, S ; Gray, J R ; Haites, N E ; Grant, A ; Campbell, M K ; Miedyzbrodzka, Z ; Clarke, A ; Watson, M S .

In: Health Technology Assessment, Vol. 9, 2005, p. 1.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

Wilson, BJ, Torrance, N, Mollison, J, Wordsworth, S, Gray, JR, Haites, NE, Grant, A, Campbell, MK, Miedyzbrodzka, Z, Clarke, A & Watson, MS 2005, 'Improving the referral process for familial breast cancer genetic counselling: findings of three randomised controlled trials of two interventions - Introduction' Health Technology Assessment, vol. 9, pp. 1.
Wilson, B J ; Torrance, N ; Mollison, J ; Wordsworth, S ; Gray, J R ; Haites, N E ; Grant, A ; Campbell, M K ; Miedyzbrodzka, Z ; Clarke, A ; Watson, M S . / Improving the referral process for familial breast cancer genetic counselling: findings of three randomised controlled trials of two interventions - Introduction. In: Health Technology Assessment. 2005 ; Vol. 9. pp. 1.
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abstract = "The current organisation of specialist genetics services within the NHS reflects their historical evolution. They have developed from academic departments to regional centres, each of which serves a number of smaller districts and usually has integrated clinical and laboratory services.(1) Until the late 1980s, UK genetics services were concerned in the main with the diagnosis of fairly uncommon congenital and inherited disorders, and counselling generally concerned reproductive issues.(2) For many years, genetic counselling has been provided almost exclusively by physicians, with the introduction of genetic counsellors or associates with a science or nursing background a fairly recent development.(3,4) Clinical genetics services have therefore had limited capacity to deal with the increasing demand which resulted from the rapid expansion of molecular genetics knowledge.(2) New ways of dealing with patient demand have been suggested; for example, an increased role for GPs,(2,5-7) supported by guidelines(8) and computer support aids,(9,10) the introduction of intermediate levels of specialist advice(2,11) and an enhanced role for nurses.(2-4,12)",
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AB - The current organisation of specialist genetics services within the NHS reflects their historical evolution. They have developed from academic departments to regional centres, each of which serves a number of smaller districts and usually has integrated clinical and laboratory services.(1) Until the late 1980s, UK genetics services were concerned in the main with the diagnosis of fairly uncommon congenital and inherited disorders, and counselling generally concerned reproductive issues.(2) For many years, genetic counselling has been provided almost exclusively by physicians, with the introduction of genetic counsellors or associates with a science or nursing background a fairly recent development.(3,4) Clinical genetics services have therefore had limited capacity to deal with the increasing demand which resulted from the rapid expansion of molecular genetics knowledge.(2) New ways of dealing with patient demand have been suggested; for example, an increased role for GPs,(2,5-7) supported by guidelines(8) and computer support aids,(9,10) the introduction of intermediate levels of specialist advice(2,11) and an enhanced role for nurses.(2-4,12)

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KW - BREAST/OVARIAN CANCER

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