In-vivo evidence that high mobility group box 1 exerts deleterious effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model and Parkinson's disease which can be attenuated by glycyrrhizin

Matteo Santoro, Walter Maetzler, Petros Stathakos, Heather L. Martin, Markus A. Hobert, Tim W. Rattray, Thomas Gasser, John V. Forrester, Daniela Berg, Kevin J. Tracey, Gernot Riedel, Peter Teismann

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Abstract

High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that is released during tissue damage from immune and non-immune cells — including microglia and neurons. HMGB1 can contribute to progression of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases which is mediated in part by interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). There is increasing evidence from in vitro studies that HMGB1 may link the two main pathophysiological components of Parkinson's disease (PD), i.e. progressive dopaminergic degeneration and chronic neuroinflammation which underlie the mechanistic basis of PD progression.

Analysis of tissue and biofluid samples from PD patients, showed increased HMGB1 levels in human postmortem substantia nigra specimens as well as in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of PD patients. In a mouse model of PD induced by sub-acute administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), systemic administration of neutralizing antibodies to HMGB1 partly inhibited the dopaminergic cell death, and reduced the increase of RAGE and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. The small natural molecule glycyrrhizin, a component from liquorice root which can directly bind to HMGB1, both suppressed MPTP-induced HMGB1 and RAGE upregulation while reducing MPTP-induced dopaminergic cell death in a dose dependent manner.

These results provide first in vivo evidence that HMGB1 serves as a powerful bridge between progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration and chronic neuroinflammation in a model of PD, suggesting that HMGB1 is a suitable target for neuroprotective trials in PD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume91
Early online date24 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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Glycyrrhizic Acid
1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine
Parkinson Disease
Cell Death
Glycyrrhiza
Microglia
Substantia Nigra
Nuclear Proteins
Neutralizing Antibodies
Autoimmune Diseases
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Disease Progression
Chronic Disease
Up-Regulation
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Neurons
Serum

Keywords

  • Parkinson's disease
  • MPTP
  • High-mobility group box 1
  • receptor for advanced glycation endproducts

Cite this

In-vivo evidence that high mobility group box 1 exerts deleterious effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model and Parkinson's disease which can be attenuated by glycyrrhizin. / Santoro, Matteo; Maetzler, Walter; Stathakos, Petros; Martin, Heather L.; Hobert, Markus A.; Rattray, Tim W.; Gasser, Thomas; Forrester, John V.; Berg, Daniela; Tracey, Kevin J.; Riedel, Gernot; Teismann, Peter.

In: Neurobiology of Disease, Vol. 91, 07.2016, p. 59-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santoro, Matteo ; Maetzler, Walter ; Stathakos, Petros ; Martin, Heather L. ; Hobert, Markus A. ; Rattray, Tim W. ; Gasser, Thomas ; Forrester, John V. ; Berg, Daniela ; Tracey, Kevin J. ; Riedel, Gernot ; Teismann, Peter. / In-vivo evidence that high mobility group box 1 exerts deleterious effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model and Parkinson's disease which can be attenuated by glycyrrhizin. In: Neurobiology of Disease. 2016 ; Vol. 91. pp. 59-68.
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abstract = "High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that is released during tissue damage from immune and non-immune cells — including microglia and neurons. HMGB1 can contribute to progression of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases which is mediated in part by interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). There is increasing evidence from in vitro studies that HMGB1 may link the two main pathophysiological components of Parkinson's disease (PD), i.e. progressive dopaminergic degeneration and chronic neuroinflammation which underlie the mechanistic basis of PD progression.Analysis of tissue and biofluid samples from PD patients, showed increased HMGB1 levels in human postmortem substantia nigra specimens as well as in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of PD patients. In a mouse model of PD induced by sub-acute administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), systemic administration of neutralizing antibodies to HMGB1 partly inhibited the dopaminergic cell death, and reduced the increase of RAGE and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. The small natural molecule glycyrrhizin, a component from liquorice root which can directly bind to HMGB1, both suppressed MPTP-induced HMGB1 and RAGE upregulation while reducing MPTP-induced dopaminergic cell death in a dose dependent manner.These results provide first in vivo evidence that HMGB1 serves as a powerful bridge between progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration and chronic neuroinflammation in a model of PD, suggesting that HMGB1 is a suitable target for neuroprotective trials in PD.",
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note = "Acknowledgements Samples were obtained from the Neuro Biobank of the University of Tuebingen, Germany (http://www.hih-tuebingen.de/nd/biobank/for-researchers/). This biobank is supported by the Hertie Institute and the DZNE. We are grateful to the staff of the Medical Research Facility for their help with the animal care. We thank Dr. Kinnari Sathe for her help with the experiments. We thank Claire A. Walker for assisting with western blot analysis. This study was supported by: Tenovus Scotland, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, Royal Society 2006/R1, NHS Endowment 14-42, and Wellcome Trust WT080782MF.",
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T1 - In-vivo evidence that high mobility group box 1 exerts deleterious effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model and Parkinson's disease which can be attenuated by glycyrrhizin

AU - Santoro, Matteo

AU - Maetzler, Walter

AU - Stathakos, Petros

AU - Martin, Heather L.

AU - Hobert, Markus A.

AU - Rattray, Tim W.

AU - Gasser, Thomas

AU - Forrester, John V.

AU - Berg, Daniela

AU - Tracey, Kevin J.

AU - Riedel, Gernot

AU - Teismann, Peter

N1 - Acknowledgements Samples were obtained from the Neuro Biobank of the University of Tuebingen, Germany (http://www.hih-tuebingen.de/nd/biobank/for-researchers/). This biobank is supported by the Hertie Institute and the DZNE. We are grateful to the staff of the Medical Research Facility for their help with the animal care. We thank Dr. Kinnari Sathe for her help with the experiments. We thank Claire A. Walker for assisting with western blot analysis. This study was supported by: Tenovus Scotland, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, Royal Society 2006/R1, NHS Endowment 14-42, and Wellcome Trust WT080782MF.

PY - 2016/7

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N2 - High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that is released during tissue damage from immune and non-immune cells — including microglia and neurons. HMGB1 can contribute to progression of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases which is mediated in part by interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). There is increasing evidence from in vitro studies that HMGB1 may link the two main pathophysiological components of Parkinson's disease (PD), i.e. progressive dopaminergic degeneration and chronic neuroinflammation which underlie the mechanistic basis of PD progression.Analysis of tissue and biofluid samples from PD patients, showed increased HMGB1 levels in human postmortem substantia nigra specimens as well as in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of PD patients. In a mouse model of PD induced by sub-acute administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), systemic administration of neutralizing antibodies to HMGB1 partly inhibited the dopaminergic cell death, and reduced the increase of RAGE and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. The small natural molecule glycyrrhizin, a component from liquorice root which can directly bind to HMGB1, both suppressed MPTP-induced HMGB1 and RAGE upregulation while reducing MPTP-induced dopaminergic cell death in a dose dependent manner.These results provide first in vivo evidence that HMGB1 serves as a powerful bridge between progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration and chronic neuroinflammation in a model of PD, suggesting that HMGB1 is a suitable target for neuroprotective trials in PD.

AB - High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that is released during tissue damage from immune and non-immune cells — including microglia and neurons. HMGB1 can contribute to progression of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases which is mediated in part by interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). There is increasing evidence from in vitro studies that HMGB1 may link the two main pathophysiological components of Parkinson's disease (PD), i.e. progressive dopaminergic degeneration and chronic neuroinflammation which underlie the mechanistic basis of PD progression.Analysis of tissue and biofluid samples from PD patients, showed increased HMGB1 levels in human postmortem substantia nigra specimens as well as in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of PD patients. In a mouse model of PD induced by sub-acute administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), systemic administration of neutralizing antibodies to HMGB1 partly inhibited the dopaminergic cell death, and reduced the increase of RAGE and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. The small natural molecule glycyrrhizin, a component from liquorice root which can directly bind to HMGB1, both suppressed MPTP-induced HMGB1 and RAGE upregulation while reducing MPTP-induced dopaminergic cell death in a dose dependent manner.These results provide first in vivo evidence that HMGB1 serves as a powerful bridge between progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration and chronic neuroinflammation in a model of PD, suggesting that HMGB1 is a suitable target for neuroprotective trials in PD.

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KW - MPTP

KW - High-mobility group box 1

KW - receptor for advanced glycation endproducts

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DO - 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.02.018

M3 - Article

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JO - Neurobiology of Disease

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