In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle

C. N. Maganaris, V. Baltzopoulos, Derek Ball, A. J. Sargeant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we estimated the specific tensions of soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in six men. Joint moments were measured during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and during electrical stimulation. Moment arm lengths and muscle volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and pennation angles and fascicular lengths were measured using ultrasonography. Tendon and muscle forces were modeled. Two approaches were followed to estimate specific tension. First, muscle moments during electrical stimulation and moment arm lengths, fascicular lengths, and pennation angles during MVC were used (data set A). Then, MVC moments, moment arm lengths at rest, and cadaveric fascicular lengths and pennation angles were used (data set B). The use of data set B gelded the unrealistic specific tension estimates of 104 kN/m(2) in Sol and 658 kN/m(2) in TA. The use of data set A, however, yielded values of 150 and 155 kN/m(2) in Sol and TA, respectively, which agree with in vitro results from fiber type I-predominant muscles. In fact, both Sol and TA are such muscles. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of accurate in vivo estimates of human muscle intrinsic strength.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)865-872
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume90
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • muscle stress
  • magnetic resonance image
  • ultrasound
  • electrical stimulation
  • modeling
  • MAXIMUM ISOMETRIC DORSIFLEXION
  • CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA
  • TENDON MOMENT ARM
  • HUMAN LOWER-LIMB
  • TIBIALIS ANTERIOR
  • TRICEPS-SURAE
  • MOTOR UNITS
  • REST
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • FORCE

Cite this

Maganaris, C. N., Baltzopoulos, V., Ball, D., & Sargeant, A. J. (2001). In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle. Journal of Applied Physiology, 90, 865-872.

In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle. / Maganaris, C. N.; Baltzopoulos, V.; Ball, Derek; Sargeant, A. J.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 90, 2001, p. 865-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maganaris, CN, Baltzopoulos, V, Ball, D & Sargeant, AJ 2001, 'In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 90, pp. 865-872.
Maganaris CN, Baltzopoulos V, Ball D, Sargeant AJ. In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2001;90:865-872.
Maganaris, C. N. ; Baltzopoulos, V. ; Ball, Derek ; Sargeant, A. J. / In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2001 ; Vol. 90. pp. 865-872.
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T1 - In vivo specific tension of human skeletal muscle

AU - Maganaris, C. N.

AU - Baltzopoulos, V.

AU - Ball, Derek

AU - Sargeant, A. J.

PY - 2001

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N2 - In this study, we estimated the specific tensions of soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in six men. Joint moments were measured during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and during electrical stimulation. Moment arm lengths and muscle volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and pennation angles and fascicular lengths were measured using ultrasonography. Tendon and muscle forces were modeled. Two approaches were followed to estimate specific tension. First, muscle moments during electrical stimulation and moment arm lengths, fascicular lengths, and pennation angles during MVC were used (data set A). Then, MVC moments, moment arm lengths at rest, and cadaveric fascicular lengths and pennation angles were used (data set B). The use of data set B gelded the unrealistic specific tension estimates of 104 kN/m(2) in Sol and 658 kN/m(2) in TA. The use of data set A, however, yielded values of 150 and 155 kN/m(2) in Sol and TA, respectively, which agree with in vitro results from fiber type I-predominant muscles. In fact, both Sol and TA are such muscles. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of accurate in vivo estimates of human muscle intrinsic strength.

AB - In this study, we estimated the specific tensions of soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in six men. Joint moments were measured during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and during electrical stimulation. Moment arm lengths and muscle volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and pennation angles and fascicular lengths were measured using ultrasonography. Tendon and muscle forces were modeled. Two approaches were followed to estimate specific tension. First, muscle moments during electrical stimulation and moment arm lengths, fascicular lengths, and pennation angles during MVC were used (data set A). Then, MVC moments, moment arm lengths at rest, and cadaveric fascicular lengths and pennation angles were used (data set B). The use of data set B gelded the unrealistic specific tension estimates of 104 kN/m(2) in Sol and 658 kN/m(2) in TA. The use of data set A, however, yielded values of 150 and 155 kN/m(2) in Sol and TA, respectively, which agree with in vitro results from fiber type I-predominant muscles. In fact, both Sol and TA are such muscles. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of accurate in vivo estimates of human muscle intrinsic strength.

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KW - TIBIALIS ANTERIOR

KW - TRICEPS-SURAE

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