Individual and Organizational Predictors of Patient Care: A Multilevel Analysis of the English National Health Service Staff Survey

Kevin Rui-Han Teoh*, Juliet Hassard, Tom Cox

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Growing evidence attests to the importance of doctors' psychosocial working conditions in relation to the provision of good quality patient care. However, few studies have explored the mechanisms of this relationship, including the role of work-related well-being as a mediator. Even fewer have done so from a multilevel perspective with organization-level predictors or informed by a theoretical framework. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, we ran multilevel structural equation models to test: (a) whether individual and organization-level psychosocial predictors influence doctors' self-reported perception of care provided; and (b) whether psychological strain and work engagement mediate these relationships. Data were drawn from a national survey of doctors (n = 14,066) and metrics from all 157 English hospital organizations. At the individual level, work overload and job control predicted quality of care, while workplace aggression and manager support did not. Indirect effects were observed for all examined psychosocial predictors and quality of care as mediated by work engagement. At the organization level, only work engagement mediated the relationships between the number of emergency admissions and the quality of organization and individual care. These findings emphasize the importance of positive manifestations of work-related well-being and the improvement of hospital working conditions. The JD-R model provides a useful framework at the individual level, although study design limitations may explain its incompatibility at the organization level.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages16
JournalInternational journal of stress management
Early online date6 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • psychosocial working conditions
  • multilevel modeling
  • quality of care
  • well-being
  • job demands-resources model
  • DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL
  • QUALITY-OF-CARE
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL SAFETY CLIMATE
  • BED OCCUPANCY RATES
  • JOB-DEMANDS
  • WORK ENGAGEMENT
  • PERFORMANCE
  • BEHAVIOR
  • BURNOUT
  • ASSOCIATIONS

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