Individual differences in trust evaluations are shaped mostly by environments, not genes

Clare A M Sutherland*, Nichola S Burton, Jeremy B Wilmer, Gabriella Blokland, Laura Germine, Romina Palermo, Jemma Collova, Gillian Rhodes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Rapid impressions of trustworthiness can have extreme consequences, impacting financial lending, partner selection, and death-penalty sentencing decisions. But to what extent do people disagree about who looks trustworthy, and why? Here, we demonstrate that individual differences in trustworthiness and other impressions are substantial and stable, agreeing with the classic idea that social perception can be influenced in part by the “eye of the beholder.” Moreover, by examining twins, we show that individual differences in impressions of trustworthiness are shaped mostly by personal experiences, instead of genes or familial experiences. Our study highlights individual social learning as a key mechanism by which we individually come to trust others, with potentially profound consequences for everyday trust decisions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10218-10224
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume117
Issue number19
Early online date27 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2020

Keywords

  • trust
  • face evaluation
  • first impressions
  • begavioural genetics
  • classical twin design
  • Classical twin design
  • Face evaluation
  • First impressions
  • Trust
  • Behavioral genetics
  • SOCIAL ATTRIBUTIONS
  • FACE RECOGNITION
  • UNIQUE
  • behavioral genetics
  • INFERENCES
  • FACIAL 1ST IMPRESSIONS
  • JUDGMENTS

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Individual differences in trust evaluations are shaped mostly by environments, not genes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this