Inflammation and Cancer: II. Role of chronic inflammation and cytokine gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancy

M Macarthur, G L Hold, E M El-Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is well established that cancer arises in chronically inflamed tissue, and this is particularly notable in the gastrointestinal tract. Classic examples include Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer. There is growing evidence to suggest that this association is not coincidental but may indeed be causal. In this review, we discuss the role of chronic inflammation and cytokine gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancy and outline some of the possible mechanisms involved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)G515-G520
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology
Volume286
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • chronic inflammation
  • carcinogenesis
  • reactive oxygen species
  • cyclooxygenase-2
  • cytokines
  • cytokine polymorphisms
  • helicobacter-pylori
  • colorectal-cancer
  • epithelial-cells
  • gastric-cancer
  • increased risk
  • interleukin-1-Beta
  • activation
  • apoptosis
  • carcinoma
  • adhesion

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Inflammation and Cancer: II. Role of chronic inflammation and cytokine gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this