Influence of alpha-tocopherol acetate on the short- and long-term storage properties of fillets from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar fed a high lipid diet

J R Scaife, G E Onibi, I Murray, T C Fletcher, D F Houlihan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During refrigeration, lipid oxidation is a major factor contributing to post-mortem deterioration of flesh quality. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially n-3 PUFA, are present in high concentration in fish tissues, and in oils used in diets, and are readily susceptible to peroxidation. alpha-Tocopherol (AT) can reduce tissue lipid peroxidation in vivo and post mortem. The effect of increasing the tissue level of AT by dietary supplementation of alpha-tocopherol acetate (ATA) was therefore investigated. Commercial salmon diets C, M and H, high in lipids, containing 184, 573 and 565 mg ATA kg(-1) diet DM (dry matter) were fed to 18 fish per treatment. Dietary AT: PUFA ratios were 2.0, 6.3, and 9.5 mg g(-1) for diets C, M and H, respectively. Fish (mean initial live weight 630 g) were slaughtered after 50 and 78 days of feeding. Fillet samples were analysed fresh or after storage at 4 degrees C for 12 days and -20 degrees C for 12 months. Lipid oxidation was measured using the thiobarbituric acid test. Colour score, but not carotenoid content, of fillets was significantly higher between 6 and 12 days of fresh storage in fish fed diets M and H compared with those fed diet C. Colour score, carotenoid content and AT content decreased and the content of lipid oxidation products increased following storage of fillets at -20 degrees C for up to 12 months, although lipid oxidation was always significantly lower in fish fed diets M and H.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalAquaculture Nutrition
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • alpha-tocopherol acetate
  • high lipid diets
  • salmon fillets
  • storage properties
  • POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS
  • VITAMIN-E
  • OXIDATIVE STABILITY
  • FROZEN STORAGE
  • CAROTENOIDS
  • ASTAXANTHIN
  • QUALITY
  • PIGMENTATION
  • ANTIOXIDANT
  • FLESH

Cite this

Influence of alpha-tocopherol acetate on the short- and long-term storage properties of fillets from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar fed a high lipid diet. / Scaife, J R ; Onibi, G E ; Murray, I ; Fletcher, T C ; Houlihan, D F .

In: Aquaculture Nutrition, Vol. 6, 2000, p. 65-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Onibi, G E

AU - Murray, I

AU - Fletcher, T C

AU - Houlihan, D F

PY - 2000

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N2 - During refrigeration, lipid oxidation is a major factor contributing to post-mortem deterioration of flesh quality. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially n-3 PUFA, are present in high concentration in fish tissues, and in oils used in diets, and are readily susceptible to peroxidation. alpha-Tocopherol (AT) can reduce tissue lipid peroxidation in vivo and post mortem. The effect of increasing the tissue level of AT by dietary supplementation of alpha-tocopherol acetate (ATA) was therefore investigated. Commercial salmon diets C, M and H, high in lipids, containing 184, 573 and 565 mg ATA kg(-1) diet DM (dry matter) were fed to 18 fish per treatment. Dietary AT: PUFA ratios were 2.0, 6.3, and 9.5 mg g(-1) for diets C, M and H, respectively. Fish (mean initial live weight 630 g) were slaughtered after 50 and 78 days of feeding. Fillet samples were analysed fresh or after storage at 4 degrees C for 12 days and -20 degrees C for 12 months. Lipid oxidation was measured using the thiobarbituric acid test. Colour score, but not carotenoid content, of fillets was significantly higher between 6 and 12 days of fresh storage in fish fed diets M and H compared with those fed diet C. Colour score, carotenoid content and AT content decreased and the content of lipid oxidation products increased following storage of fillets at -20 degrees C for up to 12 months, although lipid oxidation was always significantly lower in fish fed diets M and H.

AB - During refrigeration, lipid oxidation is a major factor contributing to post-mortem deterioration of flesh quality. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially n-3 PUFA, are present in high concentration in fish tissues, and in oils used in diets, and are readily susceptible to peroxidation. alpha-Tocopherol (AT) can reduce tissue lipid peroxidation in vivo and post mortem. The effect of increasing the tissue level of AT by dietary supplementation of alpha-tocopherol acetate (ATA) was therefore investigated. Commercial salmon diets C, M and H, high in lipids, containing 184, 573 and 565 mg ATA kg(-1) diet DM (dry matter) were fed to 18 fish per treatment. Dietary AT: PUFA ratios were 2.0, 6.3, and 9.5 mg g(-1) for diets C, M and H, respectively. Fish (mean initial live weight 630 g) were slaughtered after 50 and 78 days of feeding. Fillet samples were analysed fresh or after storage at 4 degrees C for 12 days and -20 degrees C for 12 months. Lipid oxidation was measured using the thiobarbituric acid test. Colour score, but not carotenoid content, of fillets was significantly higher between 6 and 12 days of fresh storage in fish fed diets M and H compared with those fed diet C. Colour score, carotenoid content and AT content decreased and the content of lipid oxidation products increased following storage of fillets at -20 degrees C for up to 12 months, although lipid oxidation was always significantly lower in fish fed diets M and H.

KW - alpha-tocopherol acetate

KW - high lipid diets

KW - salmon fillets

KW - storage properties

KW - POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS

KW - VITAMIN-E

KW - OXIDATIVE STABILITY

KW - FROZEN STORAGE

KW - CAROTENOIDS

KW - ASTAXANTHIN

KW - QUALITY

KW - PIGMENTATION

KW - ANTIOXIDANT

KW - FLESH

M3 - Article

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SP - 65

EP - 71

JO - Aquaculture Nutrition

JF - Aquaculture Nutrition

SN - 1353-5773

ER -