Influence of subglacial conditions on ice stream dynamics

Seismic and potential field data from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica

Andrew M. Smith, Tom A. Jordan, Fausto Ferraccioli, Robert G. Bingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We interpret seismic reflection and airborne potential field data acquired on Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica and find variations in the subglacial geology which correlate with variations in ice dynamics. Immediately beneath the glacier is a mixture of soft, deforming sediments and harder, non-deforming sediments. Beneath this, a sedimentary basin lies under part of the main glacier, with another under one of its slower-moving tributaries. A tectonic boundary underlies the main trunk of the glacier separating these sedimentary basins to the north from crystalline rocks to the south, which also include a thick, rift-related magmatic intrusion. The boundary correlates with changes in the basal roughness, ice flow speed and basal drag. Smoother bed, faster flow and lower basal drag characterize the thicker sedimentary sequences, to the north, but there is no corresponding lateral change in the acoustic properties of the bed. Changes in the sub-bed (i.e. deeper than the ice-bed interface) lithology appear to account for the contrasting basal drag and ice velocity patterns over the glacier. Subglacial erosion could remove a thin layer of soft sediments to the south of the geological boundary, leading to increased basal drag and reduced ice flow in the future. We conclude that the subglacial geology plays a significant role in controlling the spatial pattern of present-day ice flow and that the consequences of subglacial erosion may be reflected in temporal changes to the ice dynamics in the past and perhaps also in the near future.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1471-1482
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume118
Issue number4
Early online date15 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Glaciers
glaciers
ice stream
potential field
Ice
potential fields
Antarctic regions
Antarctica
glacier
ice
Pinus
drag
ice flow
Drag
beds
sedimentary basin
Sediments
sediments
geology
Geology

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • seismic
  • gravity
  • ice sheet
  • Pine Island Glacier
  • subglacial conditions
  • ice flow controls
  • West Antarctic Ice Sheet
  • seismic and potential field data
  • subglacial erosion

Cite this

Influence of subglacial conditions on ice stream dynamics : Seismic and potential field data from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica. / Smith, Andrew M.; Jordan, Tom A.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Bingham, Robert G.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 118, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 1471-1482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Andrew M. ; Jordan, Tom A. ; Ferraccioli, Fausto ; Bingham, Robert G. / Influence of subglacial conditions on ice stream dynamics : Seismic and potential field data from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica. In: Journal of Geophysical Research. 2013 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 1471-1482.
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