Influences of salinity on the physiology and distribution of the arctic coralline algae, Lithothamnion glaciale (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)

Kathryn M. Schoenrock (Corresponding Author), Marion Bacquet, Danni Pearce, Brice R Rea, J Edward Schofield, James Lea, Doug Mair, Nicholas Kamenos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Greenland, free‐living red coralline algae contribute to and dominate marine habitats along the coastline. Lithothamnion glaciale dominates coralline algae beds in many regions of the Arctic, but never in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland, where Clathromorphum sp. is dominant. To investigate environmental impacts on coralline algae distribution, calcification and primary productivity were measured in situ during summers of 2015 and 2016, and annual patterns of productivity in L. glaciale were monitored in lab‐based mesocosm experiments where temperature and salinity were manipulated to mimic high glacial melt. The results of field and cold‐room measurements indicate that both L. glaciale and Clathromorphum sp. had low calcification and photosynthetic rates during the Greenland summer (2015 and 2016), with maximum of 1.225 ± 0.17 or 0.002 ± 0.023 μmol CaCO3 · g−1 · h−1 and ‐0.007 ± 0.003 or ‐0.004 ± 0.001 mg O2 · L−1 · h−1 in each species respectively. Mesocosm experiments indicate L. glaciale is a seasonal responder; photosynthetic and calcification rates increase with annual light cycles. Further, metabolic processes in L. glaciale were negatively influenced by low salinity; positive growth rates only occurred in marine treatments where individuals accumulated an average of 1.85 ± 1.73 mg · d−1 of biomass through summer. These results indicate high freshwater input to the Godthåbsfjord region may drive the low abundance of L. glaciale, and could decrease species distribution as climate change increases fresh water input to the Arctic marine system via enhanced ice sheet runoff and glacier calving.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)690-702
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Phycology
Volume54
Issue number5
Early online date12 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

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coralline alga
calcification
physiology
mesocosm
salinity
summer
productivity
freshwater input
red alga
ice sheet
glacier
environmental impact
experiment
melt
runoff
climate change
coast
biomass
habitat
distribution

Keywords

  • Arctic
  • Clathromorphum sp.
  • ecophysiology
  • Greenland ice sheet
  • maerl
  • polar seaweeds
  • rhodolith
  • Lithothamnion glaciale
  • salinity

Cite this

Influences of salinity on the physiology and distribution of the arctic coralline algae, Lithothamnion glaciale (Corallinales, Rhodophyta). / Schoenrock, Kathryn M. (Corresponding Author); Bacquet, Marion ; Pearce, Danni; Rea, Brice R; Schofield, J Edward; Lea, James ; Mair, Doug; Kamenos, Nicholas .

In: Journal of Phycology, Vol. 54, No. 5, 10.2018, p. 690-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schoenrock, Kathryn M. ; Bacquet, Marion ; Pearce, Danni ; Rea, Brice R ; Schofield, J Edward ; Lea, James ; Mair, Doug ; Kamenos, Nicholas . / Influences of salinity on the physiology and distribution of the arctic coralline algae, Lithothamnion glaciale (Corallinales, Rhodophyta). In: Journal of Phycology. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 5. pp. 690-702.
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abstract = "In Greenland, free‐living red coralline algae contribute to and dominate marine habitats along the coastline. Lithothamnion glaciale dominates coralline algae beds in many regions of the Arctic, but never in Godth{\aa}bsfjord, Greenland, where Clathromorphum sp. is dominant. To investigate environmental impacts on coralline algae distribution, calcification and primary productivity were measured in situ during summers of 2015 and 2016, and annual patterns of productivity in L. glaciale were monitored in lab‐based mesocosm experiments where temperature and salinity were manipulated to mimic high glacial melt. The results of field and cold‐room measurements indicate that both L. glaciale and Clathromorphum sp. had low calcification and photosynthetic rates during the Greenland summer (2015 and 2016), with maximum of 1.225 ± 0.17 or 0.002 ± 0.023 μmol CaCO3 · g−1 · h−1 and ‐0.007 ± 0.003 or ‐0.004 ± 0.001 mg O2 · L−1 · h−1 in each species respectively. Mesocosm experiments indicate L. glaciale is a seasonal responder; photosynthetic and calcification rates increase with annual light cycles. Further, metabolic processes in L. glaciale were negatively influenced by low salinity; positive growth rates only occurred in marine treatments where individuals accumulated an average of 1.85 ± 1.73 mg · d−1 of biomass through summer. These results indicate high freshwater input to the Godth{\aa}bsfjord region may drive the low abundance of L. glaciale, and could decrease species distribution as climate change increases fresh water input to the Arctic marine system via enhanced ice sheet runoff and glacier calving.",
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author = "Schoenrock, {Kathryn M.} and Marion Bacquet and Danni Pearce and Rea, {Brice R} and Schofield, {J Edward} and James Lea and Doug Mair and Nicholas Kamenos",
note = "The authors would like to thank the GINR and the Nuuk Fire Department for providing logistical support in Nuuk. We are particularly grateful to thank Martin Blicher, Josephine Nymand, Thomas Juul-Pedersen, Ƚukasz Stachnik, Johanne Vad, Mackenzie Haberman, Alyssa Bell, Heather Baxter, and Jinhua Mao for their research and field assistance. Funding was provided by the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant 2014-093 “Calving Glaciers: Long Term Validation and Evidence”. Field work was also supported by the Scottish Alliance for Geoscience, Environment and Society (SAGES) “PECRE exchanges with Europe, North America, China, India” and the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland (MASTS) Small Grants Scheme. Seawater was paid for through the University of Glasgow research enabling fund and Federation of European Microbiological Societies research grant. This manuscript benefitted from discussions and review by Juliet Brodie, Sophie McCoy, Laurie Hofmann, Arley Muth, and Bonnie Lewis.",
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T1 - Influences of salinity on the physiology and distribution of the arctic coralline algae, Lithothamnion glaciale (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)

AU - Schoenrock, Kathryn M.

AU - Bacquet, Marion

AU - Pearce, Danni

AU - Rea, Brice R

AU - Schofield, J Edward

AU - Lea, James

AU - Mair, Doug

AU - Kamenos, Nicholas

N1 - The authors would like to thank the GINR and the Nuuk Fire Department for providing logistical support in Nuuk. We are particularly grateful to thank Martin Blicher, Josephine Nymand, Thomas Juul-Pedersen, Ƚukasz Stachnik, Johanne Vad, Mackenzie Haberman, Alyssa Bell, Heather Baxter, and Jinhua Mao for their research and field assistance. Funding was provided by the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant 2014-093 “Calving Glaciers: Long Term Validation and Evidence”. Field work was also supported by the Scottish Alliance for Geoscience, Environment and Society (SAGES) “PECRE exchanges with Europe, North America, China, India” and the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland (MASTS) Small Grants Scheme. Seawater was paid for through the University of Glasgow research enabling fund and Federation of European Microbiological Societies research grant. This manuscript benefitted from discussions and review by Juliet Brodie, Sophie McCoy, Laurie Hofmann, Arley Muth, and Bonnie Lewis.

PY - 2018/10

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N2 - In Greenland, free‐living red coralline algae contribute to and dominate marine habitats along the coastline. Lithothamnion glaciale dominates coralline algae beds in many regions of the Arctic, but never in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland, where Clathromorphum sp. is dominant. To investigate environmental impacts on coralline algae distribution, calcification and primary productivity were measured in situ during summers of 2015 and 2016, and annual patterns of productivity in L. glaciale were monitored in lab‐based mesocosm experiments where temperature and salinity were manipulated to mimic high glacial melt. The results of field and cold‐room measurements indicate that both L. glaciale and Clathromorphum sp. had low calcification and photosynthetic rates during the Greenland summer (2015 and 2016), with maximum of 1.225 ± 0.17 or 0.002 ± 0.023 μmol CaCO3 · g−1 · h−1 and ‐0.007 ± 0.003 or ‐0.004 ± 0.001 mg O2 · L−1 · h−1 in each species respectively. Mesocosm experiments indicate L. glaciale is a seasonal responder; photosynthetic and calcification rates increase with annual light cycles. Further, metabolic processes in L. glaciale were negatively influenced by low salinity; positive growth rates only occurred in marine treatments where individuals accumulated an average of 1.85 ± 1.73 mg · d−1 of biomass through summer. These results indicate high freshwater input to the Godthåbsfjord region may drive the low abundance of L. glaciale, and could decrease species distribution as climate change increases fresh water input to the Arctic marine system via enhanced ice sheet runoff and glacier calving.

AB - In Greenland, free‐living red coralline algae contribute to and dominate marine habitats along the coastline. Lithothamnion glaciale dominates coralline algae beds in many regions of the Arctic, but never in Godthåbsfjord, Greenland, where Clathromorphum sp. is dominant. To investigate environmental impacts on coralline algae distribution, calcification and primary productivity were measured in situ during summers of 2015 and 2016, and annual patterns of productivity in L. glaciale were monitored in lab‐based mesocosm experiments where temperature and salinity were manipulated to mimic high glacial melt. The results of field and cold‐room measurements indicate that both L. glaciale and Clathromorphum sp. had low calcification and photosynthetic rates during the Greenland summer (2015 and 2016), with maximum of 1.225 ± 0.17 or 0.002 ± 0.023 μmol CaCO3 · g−1 · h−1 and ‐0.007 ± 0.003 or ‐0.004 ± 0.001 mg O2 · L−1 · h−1 in each species respectively. Mesocosm experiments indicate L. glaciale is a seasonal responder; photosynthetic and calcification rates increase with annual light cycles. Further, metabolic processes in L. glaciale were negatively influenced by low salinity; positive growth rates only occurred in marine treatments where individuals accumulated an average of 1.85 ± 1.73 mg · d−1 of biomass through summer. These results indicate high freshwater input to the Godthåbsfjord region may drive the low abundance of L. glaciale, and could decrease species distribution as climate change increases fresh water input to the Arctic marine system via enhanced ice sheet runoff and glacier calving.

KW - Arctic

KW - Clathromorphum sp.

KW - ecophysiology

KW - Greenland ice sheet

KW - maerl

KW - polar seaweeds

KW - rhodolith

KW - Lithothamnion glaciale

KW - salinity

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DO - 10.1111/jpy.12774

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 690

EP - 702

JO - Journal of Phycology

JF - Journal of Phycology

SN - 1529-8817

IS - 5

ER -