Inherited predisposition to preeclampsia: analysis of the Aberdeen intergenerational cohort

Abimbola A. Ayorinde, Sohinee Bhattacharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective

To assess the magnitude of familial risk of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in women born of a preeclamptic pregnancy and those born of pregnancy complicated by gestational hypertension while accounting for other risk factors.

Methods

An intergenerational dataset was extracted from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) which records all pregnancy and delivery details occurring in Aberdeen, Scotland since 1950. The analysis included all nulliparous women whose mothers’ records at their births are also recorded in the AMND. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the risk of having preeclampsia or gestational hypertension based on maternal history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension.

Results

There were 17302 nulliparous women included, of whom 1057(6.1%) had preeclampsia while 4098(23.7%) had gestational hypertension. Furthermore, 424(2.5%) and 2940(17.0%) had maternal history of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension respectively. The risk of preeclampsia was higher in women who were born of pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (adjusted RRR 2.55 95% CI 1.87–3.47). This was higher than the risk observed in women whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.44 95% CI 1.23–1.69). Conversely, the risk of gestational hypertension was similar in those who were born of preeclamptic pregnancies (adjusted RRR 1.37 95% CI 1.09–1.71) and those whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.36 95% CI 1.24–1.49).

Conclusion

There was a dose response effect in the inheritance pattern of preeclampsia with the highest risk in women born of preeclamptic pregnancies. Gestational hypertension showed similar increased risk with maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37–41
Number of pages5
JournalPregnancy Hypertension
Volume8
Early online date6 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Pre-Eclampsia
Mothers
Pregnancy
Databases
Inheritance Patterns
Scotland
Logistic Models
Parturition

Keywords

  • preeclampsia
  • intergenerational
  • gestational hypertension
  • risk factors

Cite this

Inherited predisposition to preeclampsia : analysis of the Aberdeen intergenerational cohort. / Ayorinde, Abimbola A.; Bhattacharya, Sohinee.

In: Pregnancy Hypertension, Vol. 8, 01.04.2017, p. 37–41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "ObjectiveTo assess the magnitude of familial risk of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in women born of a preeclamptic pregnancy and those born of pregnancy complicated by gestational hypertension while accounting for other risk factors.MethodsAn intergenerational dataset was extracted from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) which records all pregnancy and delivery details occurring in Aberdeen, Scotland since 1950. The analysis included all nulliparous women whose mothers’ records at their births are also recorded in the AMND. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the risk of having preeclampsia or gestational hypertension based on maternal history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension.ResultsThere were 17302 nulliparous women included, of whom 1057(6.1{\%}) had preeclampsia while 4098(23.7{\%}) had gestational hypertension. Furthermore, 424(2.5{\%}) and 2940(17.0{\%}) had maternal history of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension respectively. The risk of preeclampsia was higher in women who were born of pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (adjusted RRR 2.55 95{\%} CI 1.87–3.47). This was higher than the risk observed in women whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.44 95{\%} CI 1.23–1.69). Conversely, the risk of gestational hypertension was similar in those who were born of preeclamptic pregnancies (adjusted RRR 1.37 95{\%} CI 1.09–1.71) and those whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.36 95{\%} CI 1.24–1.49).ConclusionThere was a dose response effect in the inheritance pattern of preeclampsia with the highest risk in women born of preeclamptic pregnancies. Gestational hypertension showed similar increased risk with maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.",
keywords = "preeclampsia, intergenerational , gestational hypertension, risk factors",
author = "Ayorinde, {Abimbola A.} and Sohinee Bhattacharya",
note = "The Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) related personnel are core funded by the University of Aberdeen. The authors wish to thank Doris Campbell and John Lemon who facilitated the data extraction and Dr Amalraj Raja for statistical advice. More information for accessing data from the AMND can be obtained from the AMND website www.abdn.ac.uk/amnd.",
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AU - Bhattacharya, Sohinee

N1 - The Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) related personnel are core funded by the University of Aberdeen. The authors wish to thank Doris Campbell and John Lemon who facilitated the data extraction and Dr Amalraj Raja for statistical advice. More information for accessing data from the AMND can be obtained from the AMND website www.abdn.ac.uk/amnd.

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N2 - ObjectiveTo assess the magnitude of familial risk of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in women born of a preeclamptic pregnancy and those born of pregnancy complicated by gestational hypertension while accounting for other risk factors.MethodsAn intergenerational dataset was extracted from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) which records all pregnancy and delivery details occurring in Aberdeen, Scotland since 1950. The analysis included all nulliparous women whose mothers’ records at their births are also recorded in the AMND. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the risk of having preeclampsia or gestational hypertension based on maternal history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension.ResultsThere were 17302 nulliparous women included, of whom 1057(6.1%) had preeclampsia while 4098(23.7%) had gestational hypertension. Furthermore, 424(2.5%) and 2940(17.0%) had maternal history of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension respectively. The risk of preeclampsia was higher in women who were born of pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (adjusted RRR 2.55 95% CI 1.87–3.47). This was higher than the risk observed in women whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.44 95% CI 1.23–1.69). Conversely, the risk of gestational hypertension was similar in those who were born of preeclamptic pregnancies (adjusted RRR 1.37 95% CI 1.09–1.71) and those whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.36 95% CI 1.24–1.49).ConclusionThere was a dose response effect in the inheritance pattern of preeclampsia with the highest risk in women born of preeclamptic pregnancies. Gestational hypertension showed similar increased risk with maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

AB - ObjectiveTo assess the magnitude of familial risk of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in women born of a preeclamptic pregnancy and those born of pregnancy complicated by gestational hypertension while accounting for other risk factors.MethodsAn intergenerational dataset was extracted from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) which records all pregnancy and delivery details occurring in Aberdeen, Scotland since 1950. The analysis included all nulliparous women whose mothers’ records at their births are also recorded in the AMND. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the risk of having preeclampsia or gestational hypertension based on maternal history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension.ResultsThere were 17302 nulliparous women included, of whom 1057(6.1%) had preeclampsia while 4098(23.7%) had gestational hypertension. Furthermore, 424(2.5%) and 2940(17.0%) had maternal history of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension respectively. The risk of preeclampsia was higher in women who were born of pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (adjusted RRR 2.55 95% CI 1.87–3.47). This was higher than the risk observed in women whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.44 95% CI 1.23–1.69). Conversely, the risk of gestational hypertension was similar in those who were born of preeclamptic pregnancies (adjusted RRR 1.37 95% CI 1.09–1.71) and those whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.36 95% CI 1.24–1.49).ConclusionThere was a dose response effect in the inheritance pattern of preeclampsia with the highest risk in women born of preeclamptic pregnancies. Gestational hypertension showed similar increased risk with maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

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KW - intergenerational

KW - gestational hypertension

KW - risk factors

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DO - 10.1016/j.preghy.2017.03.001

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VL - 8

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EP - 41

JO - Pregnancy Hypertension

JF - Pregnancy Hypertension

SN - 2210-7789

ER -