Inhibiting self-protective behavior in romantic relationships: Automatic partner attitudes as a resource for low self-esteem people

Sandra L. Murray, Sarah Gomillion, John G. Holmes, Brianna Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A daily diary study of married couples tested the hypothesis that automatic partner attitudes regulate self-protection for low, but not high, self-esteem people. For 14 days both partners reported trust in the other’s caring and perceived and actual rejecting and selfish behavior. On days after low self-esteem people reported less trust in their partner’s caring, those with more positive automatic partner attitudes perceived their partner to be less rejecting and selfish. They also engaged in less rejecting and selfish behavior toward their partner and their partner engaged in less selfish and rejecting behavior toward them. The current findings present the first evidence that automatic partner attitudes may help low self-esteem people inhibit the rejection sensitivity and distancing behaviors that too often undermine their relationships.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-182
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume6
Issue number2
Early online date9 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2015

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partner relationship
self-esteem
resources
civil defense
married couple
evidence

Keywords

  • self-esteem
  • close relationships
  • automatic attitudes
  • trust

Cite this

Inhibiting self-protective behavior in romantic relationships : Automatic partner attitudes as a resource for low self-esteem people. / Murray, Sandra L.; Gomillion, Sarah; Holmes, John G.; Harris, Brianna.

In: Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 173-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murray, Sandra L. ; Gomillion, Sarah ; Holmes, John G. ; Harris, Brianna. / Inhibiting self-protective behavior in romantic relationships : Automatic partner attitudes as a resource for low self-esteem people. In: Social Psychological and Personality Science. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 173-182.
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