Innate defense against fungal pathogens

Rebecca A Drummond, Sarah L Gaffen, Amy G Hise, Gordon D Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modern medical interventions, disease-induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate immune system is well equipped to recognize and destroy pathogenic fungi through specialized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbera0119620
JournalCold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2014

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Pattern Recognition Receptors
Pathogens
Fungi
Inflammasomes
Active Immunotherapy
Interleukin-17
Mycoses
Immune system
Immunosuppression
Immune System
Immunity
Homeostasis
Vaccines
Cells
Cytokines
Mutation

Cite this

Drummond, R. A., Gaffen, S. L., Hise, A. G., & Brown, G. D. (2014). Innate defense against fungal pathogens. Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, 5(6), [a0119620]. https://doi.org/10.1101/cshperspect.a019620

Innate defense against fungal pathogens. / Drummond, Rebecca A; Gaffen, Sarah L; Hise, Amy G; Brown, Gordon D.

In: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, Vol. 5, No. 6, a0119620, 10.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drummond, RA, Gaffen, SL, Hise, AG & Brown, GD 2014, 'Innate defense against fungal pathogens', Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, vol. 5, no. 6, a0119620. https://doi.org/10.1101/cshperspect.a019620
Drummond, Rebecca A ; Gaffen, Sarah L ; Hise, Amy G ; Brown, Gordon D. / Innate defense against fungal pathogens. In: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 6.
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