Institutional Stimuli and Individual Response as Explanations of Turnout

the 2009 EP Election

Richard Rose, Gabriela Borz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article sets out a social psychological theory of voting behaviour that integrates stimuli from institutions; perceptions of stimuli from such institutions as the media and government; and individual predispositions to respond. It thus clarifies the confusion caused in the classic Michigan model, which treats perceptions as individual attributes without regard to institutional stimuli. Multi-level statistical analysis of turnout at the 2009 European Parliament election shows that, after controlling for individual predispositions, institutional stimuli have a substantial effect on behaviour both contextually and by shaping individual perceptions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-22
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties
Volume23
Issue number4
Early online date28 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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stimulus
election
psychological theory
European Parliament
voting behavior
multi-level analysis
statistical analysis

Cite this

Institutional Stimuli and Individual Response as Explanations of Turnout : the 2009 EP Election. / Rose, Richard; Borz, Gabriela.

In: Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2013, p. 405-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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