Intensive blood pressure lowering increases cerebral blood flow in older subjects with hypertension

Dinesh Tryambake, Jiabao He, Michael J Firbank, John T O'Brien, Andrew M Blamire, Gary A Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypertension is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF). Intensive (<130/80 mm Hg) blood pressure (BP) lowering in older people might give greater reduction in cardiovascular risk, but there are concerns that this might produce hypoperfusion which may precipitate falls and possibly stroke. We determined the effect of intensive compared with usual BP lowering on CBF in hypertensive older subjects. Individuals aged >70 years with a history of systolic hypertension on 1 or no BP lowering drugs were recruited from primary care (n=37; age, 75±4 years; systolic BP, >150 mm Hg) and randomized to receive intensive (target BP, <130/80 mm Hg) or usual (target BP, <140/85 mm Hg) BP lowering for 12 weeks, with reviews every 2 weeks. CBF, determined using 3T arterial spin labeling MRI, and 24-hour ambulatory BP were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Baseline BP (ambulatory or in clinic) and baseline gray matter CBF were not significantly different between the groups. After treatment, BP was reduced significantly in both groups but fell more in the intensive group (26/17 versus 15/5 mm Hg; P<0.01). Over the same period, gray matter CBF increased significantly in the intensive group (7±11 mL/min per 100 g; P=0.013) but was unchanged in the usual BP target group (-3±9 mL/min per 100 g; P=0.23); P<0.01 for comparison. Intensive BP lowering in older people with hypertension increases CBF, compared with BP lowering to usual target. These findings suggest hypertension in older people shifts the autoregulatory CBF curve rightward and downward and is reversible with BP lowering.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1309-1315
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume61
Issue number6
Early online date25 Mar 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Primary Health Care

Keywords

  • aging
  • blood flow
  • blood pressure
  • cardiovascular disease
  • MRI

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Intensive blood pressure lowering increases cerebral blood flow in older subjects with hypertension. / Tryambake, Dinesh; He, Jiabao; Firbank, Michael J; O'Brien, John T; Blamire, Andrew M; Ford, Gary A.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 61, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1309-1315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tryambake, Dinesh ; He, Jiabao ; Firbank, Michael J ; O'Brien, John T ; Blamire, Andrew M ; Ford, Gary A. / Intensive blood pressure lowering increases cerebral blood flow in older subjects with hypertension. In: Hypertension. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 6. pp. 1309-1315.
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