Interactions between aquatic plants and turbulent flow: A field study using stereoscopic PIV

S.M. Cameron, V.I. Nikora, I. Albayrak, O. Miler, M. Stewart, F. Siniscalchi

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Abstract

A stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) system for use in shallow (∼0.5 m deep) rivers was developed and deployed in the Urie River, Scotland, to study the interactions between turbulent flow and a Ranunculus penicillatus plant patch in its native environment. Statistical moments of the velocity field were calculated utilizing a new method of reducing the contribution of measurement noise, based on the measurement redundancy inherent in the stereoscopic PIV method. Reynolds normal and shear stresses, their budget terms, and higher-order moments of the velocity probability distribution in the wake of the plant patch were found to be dominated by the presence of a free shear layer induced by the plant drag. Plant motion, estimated from the PIV images, was characterized by travelling waves that propagate along the plant with a velocity similar to the eddy convection velocity, suggesting a direct coupling between turbulence and the plant motion. The characteristic frequency of the plant velocity fluctuations (∼1 Hz) may suggest that the plant motion is dominated by large eddies with scale similar to the flow depth or plant length. Plant and fluid velocity fluctuations were, in contrast, found to be strongly correlated only over a narrow (∼30 mm) elevation range above the top of the plant, supporting a contribution of the shear layer turbulence to the plant motion. Many aspects of flow–aquatic plant interactions remain to be clarified, and the newly developed stereoscopic field PIV system should prove valuable in future studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-372
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Fluid Mechanics
Volume732
Early online date5 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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aquatic plants
particle image velocimetry
Velocity measurement
turbulent flow
Turbulent flow
shear layers
rivers
interactions
turbulence
vortices
Turbulence
Scotland
distribution moments
Rivers
redundancy
noise measurement
traveling waves
wakes
budgets
shear stress

Keywords

  • flow–structure interactions
  • river dynamics
  • shear layer turbulence

Cite this

Interactions between aquatic plants and turbulent flow : A field study using stereoscopic PIV. / Cameron, S.M.; Nikora, V.I.; Albayrak, I.; Miler, O.; Stewart, M.; Siniscalchi, F.

In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 732, 10.2013, p. 345-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cameron, S.M. ; Nikora, V.I. ; Albayrak, I. ; Miler, O. ; Stewart, M. ; Siniscalchi, F. / Interactions between aquatic plants and turbulent flow : A field study using stereoscopic PIV. In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 2013 ; Vol. 732. pp. 345-372.
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