Interactions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil saprotrophs: implications for soil organic matter decomposition and degradation of organic pollutants in the rhizosphere

J. W. G. Cairney, Andrew Alexander Meharg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprotrophic microorganisms coexist and interact in the mycorrhizosphere. We review what is known regarding these interactions and how they may influence processes such as ectomycorrhiza formation, mycelial growth, and the dynamics of carbon movement to and within the rhizosphere. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential importance of interactions in decomposition of soil organic matter and degradation of persistant organic pollutants in soil. While our knowledge is currently fairly limited, it seems likely that interactions have profound effects on mycorrhizosphere processes. More extensive research is warranted to provide novel insights into mycorrhizosphere ecology and to explore the potential for manipulating the ectomycorrhizosphere environment for biotechnological purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803-809
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal Of Botany/Revue Canadienne De Botanique
Volume80
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • ectomycorrhizal fungi
  • ectomycorrhizosphere
  • rhizosphere
  • rhizosphere carbon flow
  • decomposition
  • rhizosphere remediation
  • MYCORRHIZATION HELPER BACTERIA
  • PAXILLUS-INVOLUTUS MYCORRHIZOSPHERES
  • INTERCONNECTING HOST PLANTS
  • SPRUCE PICEA-SITCHENSIS
  • DOUGLAS-FIR
  • VEGETATIVE MYCELIUM
  • SCOTS PINE
  • LACCARIA-LACCATA
  • FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS
  • COMMUNITY STRUCTURE

Cite this

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title = "Interactions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil saprotrophs: implications for soil organic matter decomposition and degradation of organic pollutants in the rhizosphere",
abstract = "Ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprotrophic microorganisms coexist and interact in the mycorrhizosphere. We review what is known regarding these interactions and how they may influence processes such as ectomycorrhiza formation, mycelial growth, and the dynamics of carbon movement to and within the rhizosphere. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential importance of interactions in decomposition of soil organic matter and degradation of persistant organic pollutants in soil. While our knowledge is currently fairly limited, it seems likely that interactions have profound effects on mycorrhizosphere processes. More extensive research is warranted to provide novel insights into mycorrhizosphere ecology and to explore the potential for manipulating the ectomycorrhizosphere environment for biotechnological purposes.",
keywords = "ectomycorrhizal fungi, ectomycorrhizosphere, rhizosphere, rhizosphere carbon flow, decomposition, rhizosphere remediation, MYCORRHIZATION HELPER BACTERIA, PAXILLUS-INVOLUTUS MYCORRHIZOSPHERES, INTERCONNECTING HOST PLANTS, SPRUCE PICEA-SITCHENSIS, DOUGLAS-FIR, VEGETATIVE MYCELIUM, SCOTS PINE, LACCARIA-LACCATA, FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS, COMMUNITY STRUCTURE",
author = "Cairney, {J. W. G.} and Meharg, {Andrew Alexander}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1139/b02-072",
language = "English",
volume = "80",
pages = "803--809",
journal = "Canadian Journal Of Botany/Revue Canadienne De Botanique",
issn = "0008-4026",
publisher = "NRC Research Press",

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T1 - Interactions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil saprotrophs: implications for soil organic matter decomposition and degradation of organic pollutants in the rhizosphere

AU - Cairney, J. W. G.

AU - Meharg, Andrew Alexander

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprotrophic microorganisms coexist and interact in the mycorrhizosphere. We review what is known regarding these interactions and how they may influence processes such as ectomycorrhiza formation, mycelial growth, and the dynamics of carbon movement to and within the rhizosphere. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential importance of interactions in decomposition of soil organic matter and degradation of persistant organic pollutants in soil. While our knowledge is currently fairly limited, it seems likely that interactions have profound effects on mycorrhizosphere processes. More extensive research is warranted to provide novel insights into mycorrhizosphere ecology and to explore the potential for manipulating the ectomycorrhizosphere environment for biotechnological purposes.

AB - Ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprotrophic microorganisms coexist and interact in the mycorrhizosphere. We review what is known regarding these interactions and how they may influence processes such as ectomycorrhiza formation, mycelial growth, and the dynamics of carbon movement to and within the rhizosphere. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential importance of interactions in decomposition of soil organic matter and degradation of persistant organic pollutants in soil. While our knowledge is currently fairly limited, it seems likely that interactions have profound effects on mycorrhizosphere processes. More extensive research is warranted to provide novel insights into mycorrhizosphere ecology and to explore the potential for manipulating the ectomycorrhizosphere environment for biotechnological purposes.

KW - ectomycorrhizal fungi

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KW - rhizosphere carbon flow

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KW - rhizosphere remediation

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KW - PAXILLUS-INVOLUTUS MYCORRHIZOSPHERES

KW - INTERCONNECTING HOST PLANTS

KW - SPRUCE PICEA-SITCHENSIS

KW - DOUGLAS-FIR

KW - VEGETATIVE MYCELIUM

KW - SCOTS PINE

KW - LACCARIA-LACCATA

KW - FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

KW - COMMUNITY STRUCTURE

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JO - Canadian Journal Of Botany/Revue Canadienne De Botanique

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