Introducing novel uses of multibeam sonar to study basking sharks in the light of marine renewable energy extraction

Lilian Lieber, Benjamin Williamson, Catherine S Jones, Leslie R Noble, Andrew Brierley, Peter Miller, Beth E Scott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Reaching over 12m in length, basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) are the largest fish in the Northeast Atlantic and seasonally aggregate in UK coastal waters. Little is known about their behaviour during aggregations and as the rate of marine renewable energy development increases, there is an urgent need to develop resource-efficient platforms for monitoring basking sharks. Despite their size, quantifying their natural behaviour in plankton-rich waters remains a major challenge. Here, we present the successful application of a Teledyne RESON (Seabat 7128) multibeam sonar to track basking sharks at a key aggregation site on the West Coast of Scotland. First results of individual fine-scale tracking indicate that multibeam sonar is a promising tool for acoustic detection and tracking from a safe distance to the target species.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies (EIMR2014)
PublisherEIMR
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies (EIMR2014) - Stornoway, United Kingdom
Duration: 28 Apr 20142 May 2014

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies (EIMR2014)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityStornoway
Period28/04/142/05/14

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