Introduction: Public Management and Performance: Research Directions

Richard M. Walker, George A. Boyne, Gene A. Brewer

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The performance of public services is one of the central policy issues across the globe. Response to the global financial crisis during the late 2000s was typically led by government - in the UK and USA governments stepped into the banking system and either shored up these institutions or nationalized them, whereas in China the Communist Party sought to spend its way out of recession. The emergence of SARS in the early 2000s and the subsequent swine flu epidemic were public health crises managed and coordinated by public organizations: some of these were international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, but the majority of the heavy lifting was done at the coal face by public organizations and health agencies. The majority of crises, whether they are perpetrated by people (e.g. terrorist attacks, mass genocide or nuclear accidents) or result from natural catastrophes (e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis or famine), require public action. These global and high-impact examples are the tip of the iceberg - public services touch the majority of people in advanced and developing economies on a daily basis: children require schooling, the elderly need personal care and assistance, rubbish needs collecting to prevent public health incidents and the public needs to be confident that the water they drink is potable and the food they eat is safe. Moreover, government must protect its people from internal and external threats such as civil war and foreign invasion. In short, public services shore up our world and therefore knowledge about strategies to improve their performance is central to the good of society.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPublic Management and Performance
    Subtitle of host publicationResearch Directions
    EditorsRichard M. Walker, George A. Boyne, Gene A. Brewer
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Pages1-33
    Number of pages33
    ISBN (Electronic)9780511760587
    ISBN (Print)9780521116633, 9781107411678
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010

    Fingerprint

    Public services
    Research directions
    Government
    Public management
    Public health
    Public organizations
    Severe acute respiratory syndrome
    Tsunami
    Recession
    Threat
    Civil war
    Genocide
    Food
    Earthquake
    Accidents
    China
    Famine
    Globe
    World Health Organization
    Communist Party

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

    Cite this

    Walker, R. M., Boyne, G. A., & Brewer, G. A. (2010). Introduction: Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. In R. M. Walker, G. A. Boyne, & G. A. Brewer (Eds.), Public Management and Performance: Research Directions (pp. 1-33). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001

    Introduction : Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. / Walker, Richard M.; Boyne, George A.; Brewer, Gene A.

    Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. ed. / Richard M. Walker; George A. Boyne; Gene A. Brewer. Cambridge University Press, 2010. p. 1-33.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Walker, RM, Boyne, GA & Brewer, GA 2010, Introduction: Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. in RM Walker, GA Boyne & GA Brewer (eds), Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-33. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001
    Walker RM, Boyne GA, Brewer GA. Introduction: Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. In Walker RM, Boyne GA, Brewer GA, editors, Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. Cambridge University Press. 2010. p. 1-33 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001
    Walker, Richard M. ; Boyne, George A. ; Brewer, Gene A. / Introduction : Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. Public Management and Performance: Research Directions. editor / Richard M. Walker ; George A. Boyne ; Gene A. Brewer. Cambridge University Press, 2010. pp. 1-33
    @inbook{9d152a2917574f558c754729c5c915d0,
    title = "Introduction: Public Management and Performance: Research Directions",
    abstract = "The performance of public services is one of the central policy issues across the globe. Response to the global financial crisis during the late 2000s was typically led by government - in the UK and USA governments stepped into the banking system and either shored up these institutions or nationalized them, whereas in China the Communist Party sought to spend its way out of recession. The emergence of SARS in the early 2000s and the subsequent swine flu epidemic were public health crises managed and coordinated by public organizations: some of these were international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, but the majority of the heavy lifting was done at the coal face by public organizations and health agencies. The majority of crises, whether they are perpetrated by people (e.g. terrorist attacks, mass genocide or nuclear accidents) or result from natural catastrophes (e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis or famine), require public action. These global and high-impact examples are the tip of the iceberg - public services touch the majority of people in advanced and developing economies on a daily basis: children require schooling, the elderly need personal care and assistance, rubbish needs collecting to prevent public health incidents and the public needs to be confident that the water they drink is potable and the food they eat is safe. Moreover, government must protect its people from internal and external threats such as civil war and foreign invasion. In short, public services shore up our world and therefore knowledge about strategies to improve their performance is central to the good of society.",
    author = "Walker, {Richard M.} and Boyne, {George A.} and Brewer, {Gene A.}",
    year = "2010",
    month = "9",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "9780521116633",
    pages = "1--33",
    editor = "Walker, {Richard M.} and Boyne, {George A.} and Brewer, {Gene A.}",
    booktitle = "Public Management and Performance",
    publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

    }

    TY - CHAP

    T1 - Introduction

    T2 - Public Management and Performance: Research Directions

    AU - Walker, Richard M.

    AU - Boyne, George A.

    AU - Brewer, Gene A.

    PY - 2010/9/1

    Y1 - 2010/9/1

    N2 - The performance of public services is one of the central policy issues across the globe. Response to the global financial crisis during the late 2000s was typically led by government - in the UK and USA governments stepped into the banking system and either shored up these institutions or nationalized them, whereas in China the Communist Party sought to spend its way out of recession. The emergence of SARS in the early 2000s and the subsequent swine flu epidemic were public health crises managed and coordinated by public organizations: some of these were international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, but the majority of the heavy lifting was done at the coal face by public organizations and health agencies. The majority of crises, whether they are perpetrated by people (e.g. terrorist attacks, mass genocide or nuclear accidents) or result from natural catastrophes (e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis or famine), require public action. These global and high-impact examples are the tip of the iceberg - public services touch the majority of people in advanced and developing economies on a daily basis: children require schooling, the elderly need personal care and assistance, rubbish needs collecting to prevent public health incidents and the public needs to be confident that the water they drink is potable and the food they eat is safe. Moreover, government must protect its people from internal and external threats such as civil war and foreign invasion. In short, public services shore up our world and therefore knowledge about strategies to improve their performance is central to the good of society.

    AB - The performance of public services is one of the central policy issues across the globe. Response to the global financial crisis during the late 2000s was typically led by government - in the UK and USA governments stepped into the banking system and either shored up these institutions or nationalized them, whereas in China the Communist Party sought to spend its way out of recession. The emergence of SARS in the early 2000s and the subsequent swine flu epidemic were public health crises managed and coordinated by public organizations: some of these were international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, but the majority of the heavy lifting was done at the coal face by public organizations and health agencies. The majority of crises, whether they are perpetrated by people (e.g. terrorist attacks, mass genocide or nuclear accidents) or result from natural catastrophes (e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis or famine), require public action. These global and high-impact examples are the tip of the iceberg - public services touch the majority of people in advanced and developing economies on a daily basis: children require schooling, the elderly need personal care and assistance, rubbish needs collecting to prevent public health incidents and the public needs to be confident that the water they drink is potable and the food they eat is safe. Moreover, government must protect its people from internal and external threats such as civil war and foreign invasion. In short, public services shore up our world and therefore knowledge about strategies to improve their performance is central to the good of society.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923429485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001

    DO - 10.1017/CBO9780511760587.001

    M3 - Chapter

    SN - 9780521116633

    SN - 9781107411678

    SP - 1

    EP - 33

    BT - Public Management and Performance

    A2 - Walker, Richard M.

    A2 - Boyne, George A.

    A2 - Brewer, Gene A.

    PB - Cambridge University Press

    ER -