Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions

Andrew Walker, Advaith Siddharthan, Andrew Starkey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a study that investigates the fac tors that determine what makes a good lexi cal substitution. We begin by observing that there is a correlation between the corpus fre quency of words and the number of WordNet senses they have, and hypothesise that readers might prefer common, but ambiguous terms over less ambiguous but less common words. In this paper we identify four properties of a word that determine whether it is a suit able substitution in a given context, and ask volunteers to rank their preferences between two common but ambiguous lexical substi tutions, and two uncommon but also unambiguous ones. Preliminary results suggest a slight preference towards the unambiguous.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011
Event13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation - Nancy, France
Duration: 28 Sep 201130 Sep 2011

Conference

Conference13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation
CountryFrance
CityNancy
Period28/09/1130/09/11

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Substitution
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WordNet

Cite this

Walker, A., Siddharthan, A., & Starkey, A. (2011). Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions. In Proceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation

Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions. / Walker, Andrew; Siddharthan, Advaith; Starkey, Andrew.

Proceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation. 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Walker, A, Siddharthan, A & Starkey, A 2011, Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions. in Proceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation. 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation, Nancy, France, 28/09/11.
Walker A, Siddharthan A, Starkey A. Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions. In Proceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation. 2011
Walker, Andrew ; Siddharthan, Advaith ; Starkey, Andrew. / Investigation into Human Preference between Common and Unambiguous Lexical Substitutions. Proceedings of the 13th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation. 2011.
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