Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat

Lorraine Gambling, Susan Dunford, Donna Isobel Wallace, Grietje Zuur, Nita Solanky, S Kaila S Srai, Harry J McArdle

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    129 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Iron (Fe) deficiency anaemia during pregnancy results in an increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity and is a significant factor for increased risk of disease in later life. Consequently we have developed a rat model to study the relationship between maternal Fe deficiency and postnatal growth and blood pressure in the offspring. Weanlings were fed a control or Fe-deficient diet prior to and throughout pregnancy. At term, all pups were cross-fostered to control fed dams and weaned onto control diet. At birth, pups from deficient dams had a greater mortality rate, were smaller and had reduced haematocrit and liver Fe levels. They also had larger hearts, smaller kidneys and spleens and unchanged livers (relative organ weight). The pups grew normally. At 6 weeks, male pups from deficient dams had a higher and females a lower blood pressure than their normal counterparts. At 10 and 16 weeks, blood pressure in the males from deficient dams was still raised and in the females was now greater than controls. The haematocrit was lower in males throughout the 16 weeks and in females until 10 weeks of age. There was no significant difference in the offsprings' liver Fe stores at 6, 10 or 16 weeks. Duodenal Fe uptake in both the Fe-deficient mother and newborn offspring was significantly increased. By cross-fostering, we have eliminated confounding factors, such as maternal anaemia during lactation and show, unequivocally, that prenatal nutrition is critical for the development of normal postnatal function.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)603-610
    Number of pages8
    JournalThe Journal of Physiology
    Volume552
    Issue number2
    Early online date15 Aug 2003
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2003

    Fingerprint

    Iron
    Mothers
    Blood Pressure
    Hematocrit
    Pregnancy
    Liver
    Diet
    Foster Home Care
    Organ Size
    Iron-Deficiency Anemias
    Perinatal Mortality
    Lactation
    Anemia
    Spleen
    Parturition
    Newborn Infant
    Morbidity
    Kidney
    Mortality
    Growth

    Keywords

    • Animals
    • Animals, Newborn
    • Blood Pressure
    • Body Weight
    • Diet
    • Duodenum
    • Female
    • Glucose Tolerance Test
    • Hematocrit
    • Insulin
    • Iron
    • Iron Radioisotopes
    • Nutritional Status
    • Pregnancy
    • Pregnancy, Animal
    • Rats
    • Spectrophotometry, Atomic

    Cite this

    Gambling, L., Dunford, S., Wallace, D. I., Zuur, G., Solanky, N., Srai, S. K. S., & McArdle, H. J. (2003). Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat. The Journal of Physiology, 552(2), 603-610. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.051383

    Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat. / Gambling, Lorraine; Dunford, Susan; Wallace, Donna Isobel; Zuur, Grietje; Solanky, Nita; Srai, S Kaila S; McArdle, Harry J.

    In: The Journal of Physiology, Vol. 552, No. 2, 15.10.2003, p. 603-610.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Gambling, L, Dunford, S, Wallace, DI, Zuur, G, Solanky, N, Srai, SKS & McArdle, HJ 2003, 'Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat', The Journal of Physiology, vol. 552, no. 2, pp. 603-610. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.051383
    Gambling L, Dunford S, Wallace DI, Zuur G, Solanky N, Srai SKS et al. Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat. The Journal of Physiology. 2003 Oct 15;552(2):603-610. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.051383
    Gambling, Lorraine ; Dunford, Susan ; Wallace, Donna Isobel ; Zuur, Grietje ; Solanky, Nita ; Srai, S Kaila S ; McArdle, Harry J. / Iron deficiency during pregnancy affects postnatal blood pressure in the rat. In: The Journal of Physiology. 2003 ; Vol. 552, No. 2. pp. 603-610.
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