Is experimental motion blindness due to sensory suppression? An ERP approach

M. Niedeggen, G. Hesselmann, Maarten Valentijn Milders, C. Blakemore, Arash Sahraie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent psychophysical studies have revealed attentional modulation of visual motion perception and interest now focuses on the locus of this interaction. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) we examined whether transient motion blindness evoked in a dual task [Vision Res. 41 (2001) 1613-1617] is related to a selection process occurring at the stage of sensory processing or at a higher level. In our paradigm, a particular change of colour of the fixation point cued the subject to detect a brief episode of coherent random dot motion embedded in a succession of episodes of incoherent motion. Detection of the coherent motion was significantly impaired when it occurred simultaneously with the colour cue, and recovered over the subsequent 300 ms. This functional relationship was reflected in the amplitude of a sensory, motion-evoked component (N200), and in a late positive complex (P300). However, a direct comparison of ERPs produced by stimuli that were detected or missed revealed differences only in the P300 component. These results indicate that attenuation of sensory motion processing does not account for this transient, attention-induced deficit in visual motion perception. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-247
Number of pages6
JournalCognitive Brain Research
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • motion perception
  • attention
  • event-related brain potential
  • experimental blindness
  • ATTENTIONAL BLINK
  • EVOKED-POTENTIALS
  • APPARENT MOTION
  • VISUAL-MOTION
  • MODULATION
  • P300
  • ADAPTATION
  • PERCEPTION
  • ONSET

Cite this

Is experimental motion blindness due to sensory suppression? An ERP approach. / Niedeggen, M.; Hesselmann, G.; Milders, Maarten Valentijn; Blakemore, C.; Sahraie, Arash.

In: Cognitive Brain Research, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2002, p. 241-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Niedeggen, M. ; Hesselmann, G. ; Milders, Maarten Valentijn ; Blakemore, C. ; Sahraie, Arash. / Is experimental motion blindness due to sensory suppression? An ERP approach. In: Cognitive Brain Research. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 241-247.
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