Is Liver Ultrasound Useful as Part of the Surveillance Strategy following Potentially Curative Colorectal Cancer Resection?

James Schneider (Corresponding Author), Michalis Koullouros, Craig MacKay, George Ramsay, Craig Parnaby, Lynn Stevenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Optimal surveillance monitoring following curative resection of colorectal cancer remains unclear. Guidelines recommend computed tomography (CT)-based imaging for the initial 3 years following surgical intervention due to the high rates of local and distant recurrence. However, there is currently limited supporting evidence for this strategy. Our current follow-up practice is to offer annual interval abdominal ultrasound and abdominal/pelvis CT scans starting at 6 and 12 months with the sequence of radiological follow-up remaining at the discretion of each clinician. We aim to establish the additional diagnostic benefit of abdominal ultrasound to CT scans in colorectal cancer surveillance follow-up. Methods: All patients who underwent colorectal resection with curative intent in our region during a single year were included. Patients were detected from a prospectively collected pathology database and supplemented retrospectively with patient demographics, imaging reports, and mortality data. Results: A total of 243 patients (male n = 135, 55.6%) were included. There was a mortality rate of 31.3% over the study period. Patients who received abdominal ultrasound as their initial imaging modality (n = 64, 26.3%) were significantly older, had less severe disease, and a significantly lower mortality rate when compared to CT -patients (n = 148, 60.9%). All patients with new hepatic disease detected by ultrasound scans had their management discussed in multi-disciplinary team meetings before their next scheduled CT. Conclusion: In an era where cross-sectional imaging of colorectal cancer is commonplace, abdominal ultrasound offers additional benefit to CT as a postoperative imaging adjunct for the detection of hepatic disease recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-238
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Diseases
Volume37
Issue number3
Early online date22 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Tomography
Liver
Mortality
Recurrence
Pelvis
Demography
Databases
Guidelines
Pathology

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Surveillance monitoring
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Is Liver Ultrasound Useful as Part of the Surveillance Strategy following Potentially Curative Colorectal Cancer Resection? / Schneider, James (Corresponding Author); Koullouros, Michalis; MacKay, Craig; Ramsay, George; Parnaby, Craig; Stevenson, Lynn.

In: Digestive Diseases, Vol. 37, No. 3, 02.2019, p. 234-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schneider, James ; Koullouros, Michalis ; MacKay, Craig ; Ramsay, George ; Parnaby, Craig ; Stevenson, Lynn. / Is Liver Ultrasound Useful as Part of the Surveillance Strategy following Potentially Curative Colorectal Cancer Resection?. In: Digestive Diseases. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 234-238.
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