Is routine hospital episode data sufficient for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease?

A comparison study with laboratory data

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Internationally, investment in the availability of routine health care data for improving health, health surveillance and health care is increasing. We assessed the validity of hospital episode data for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease compared to biochemistry data in a large population-based cohort, the Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II (n = 70,435). Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II links hospital episode data to biochemistry data for all adults in a health region with impaired kidney function and random samples of individuals with normal and unmeasured kidney function in 2003. We compared identification of individuals with chronic kidney disease by hospital episode data (based on International Classification of Diseases-10 codes) to the reference standard of biochemistry data (at least two estimated glomerular filtration rates <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at least 90 days apart). Hospital episode data, compared to biochemistry data, identified a lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease and had low sensitivity (<10%) but high specificity (>97%). Using routine health care data from multiple sources offers the best opportunity to identify individuals with chronic kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-396
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Informatics Journal
Volume22
Issue number2
Early online date31 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Biochemistry
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Chronic Disease Hospitals
Morbidity
Kidney
Mortality
Information Storage and Retrieval
International Classification of Diseases
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Population

Keywords

  • databases and data mining
  • ehealth
  • electronic health records
  • record linkage
  • secondary care

Cite this

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title = "Is routine hospital episode data sufficient for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease?: A comparison study with laboratory data",
abstract = "Internationally, investment in the availability of routine health care data for improving health, health surveillance and health care is increasing. We assessed the validity of hospital episode data for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease compared to biochemistry data in a large population-based cohort, the Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II (n = 70,435). Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II links hospital episode data to biochemistry data for all adults in a health region with impaired kidney function and random samples of individuals with normal and unmeasured kidney function in 2003. We compared identification of individuals with chronic kidney disease by hospital episode data (based on International Classification of Diseases-10 codes) to the reference standard of biochemistry data (at least two estimated glomerular filtration rates <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at least 90 days apart). Hospital episode data, compared to biochemistry data, identified a lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease and had low sensitivity (<10{\%}) but high specificity (>97{\%}). Using routine health care data from multiple sources offers the best opportunity to identify individuals with chronic kidney disease.",
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author = "Robertson, {Lynn M.} and Lucas Denadai and Corri Black and Nicholas Fluck and Gordon Prescott and William Simpson and Katie Wilde and Angharad Marks",
note = "Acknowledgements We thank the Information Services Division, Scotland, who provided the SMR01 data, and NHS Grampian, who provided the biochemistry data. We also thank the University of Aberdeen’s Data Management Team. Funding This work was supported by the Chief Scientists Office for Scotland (grant no. CZH/4/656).",
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AU - Simpson, William

AU - Wilde, Katie

AU - Marks, Angharad

N1 - Acknowledgements We thank the Information Services Division, Scotland, who provided the SMR01 data, and NHS Grampian, who provided the biochemistry data. We also thank the University of Aberdeen’s Data Management Team. Funding This work was supported by the Chief Scientists Office for Scotland (grant no. CZH/4/656).

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N2 - Internationally, investment in the availability of routine health care data for improving health, health surveillance and health care is increasing. We assessed the validity of hospital episode data for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease compared to biochemistry data in a large population-based cohort, the Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II (n = 70,435). Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II links hospital episode data to biochemistry data for all adults in a health region with impaired kidney function and random samples of individuals with normal and unmeasured kidney function in 2003. We compared identification of individuals with chronic kidney disease by hospital episode data (based on International Classification of Diseases-10 codes) to the reference standard of biochemistry data (at least two estimated glomerular filtration rates <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at least 90 days apart). Hospital episode data, compared to biochemistry data, identified a lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease and had low sensitivity (<10%) but high specificity (>97%). Using routine health care data from multiple sources offers the best opportunity to identify individuals with chronic kidney disease.

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