Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces

Stina Borø, Christine A McCartney, Tim J Snelling, Hilary J Worgan, Neil R McEwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacteria were isolated from rabbit faeces using equine caecal fluid as a growth medium. Two new isolates of the genus Streptococcus are described in terms of their biochemical properties. One of these has a 16S rRNA gene with 97.7%, and the other 98.5%, identity to Streptococcus thoraltensis. While S. thoraltensis has been described in the intestinal tract of pigs, it is generally considered to inhabit the porcine genital tract. The biochemical properties of these bacteria indicate that both new isolates showed an ability to digest xylose, an adaptation beneficial for survival in a niche where much of the nutrient supply is of plant origin. Moreover, having bacteria able to digest xylose in the digestive tract should be beneficial to the rabbit, allowing more effective utilisation and digestion of food. This work provides one of the few examples of an analysis of the physiological properties of a bacterium found in the hindgut of the rabbit. By building up a number of such studies, the mechanisms of bacterial digestion in the rabbit will become better understood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-360
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Microbiology
Volume61
Issue number4
Early online date9 Mar 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

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Streptococcus
Feces
Rabbits
Bacteria
Xylose
Digestion
Swine
Food
rRNA Genes
Horses
Gastrointestinal Tract
Growth

Cite this

Borø, S., McCartney, C. A., Snelling, T. J., Worgan, H. J., & McEwan, N. R. (2010). Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces. Current Microbiology, 61(4), 357-360. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-010-9619-0

Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces. / Borø, Stina; McCartney, Christine A; Snelling, Tim J; Worgan, Hilary J; McEwan, Neil R.

In: Current Microbiology, Vol. 61, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 357-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borø, S, McCartney, CA, Snelling, TJ, Worgan, HJ & McEwan, NR 2010, 'Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces', Current Microbiology, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 357-360. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-010-9619-0
Borø S, McCartney CA, Snelling TJ, Worgan HJ, McEwan NR. Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces. Current Microbiology. 2010 Oct;61(4):357-360. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-010-9619-0
Borø, Stina ; McCartney, Christine A ; Snelling, Tim J ; Worgan, Hilary J ; McEwan, Neil R. / Isolation of Streptococcus thoraltensis from rabbit faeces. In: Current Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 61, No. 4. pp. 357-360.
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