Itinerant encounters beyond the metropolis: expanding sedentary perspectives on teaching through pop-up community classrooms

Christian H. Hanser, Education in the North

Research output: Contribution to journalFeaturepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, I highlight the often underestimated role of mobilities in teaching and teacher education through the example of the Welcome Hut, an itinerant classroom in a ‘tiny house’. Applying a fluid lens in the debate around remoteness, the focus here is on emancipatory processes through which mobilities can influence educational provision and policies. In an itinerant as well as locally connected curriculum, remoteness is perceived as a strength rather than as a label to be overcome. Beyond centrist prescriptions, those schools declared remote can deliberately play with their own centralities at the fringe to provide an enabling learning environment for singular belongings and inventive ways to educate beyond the metropolis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-266
Number of pages11
JournalEducation in the North
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • itinerant education
  • mobilities turn
  • tiny house
  • strength-based remoteness
  • assimilation

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