Junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of errors

Cristín Ryan, Sarah Ross, Peter Davey, Eilidh M Duncan, Shona Fielding, Jill J Francis, Marie Johnston, Jean Ker, Amanda Jane Lee, Mary Joan Macleod, Simon Maxwell, Gerard McKay, James McLay, David J Webb, Christine Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIMS: Explore and compare junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of those errors. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was distributed to foundation doctors throughout Scotland, based on Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and Human Error Theory (HET). RESULTS: 548 questionnaires were completed (35.0% of the national cohort). F1s estimated a higher daytime error rate (median 6.7 (IQR 2-12.4)) than F2s (4.0 IQR (0-10) (p=0.002)), calculated based on the total number of medicines prescribed. The majority of self-reported errors (250; 49.2%) resulted from unintentional actions. Interruptions and pressure from other staff were commonly cited causes of errors. F1s were more likely to report insufficient prescribing skills as a potential cause of error than F2s (p= 0.002). The prescribers did not believe that the outcomes of their errors were serious. F2s reported higher self-efficacy scores than F1s in most aspects of prescribing (p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)980-987
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume76
Issue number6
Early online date20 Nov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Self Efficacy
Scotland
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pressure
Surveys and Questionnaires
Social Theory

Keywords

  • junior doctors
  • prescribing errors
  • patient safety
  • causes
  • self-efficacy
  • social cognitive theory
  • human error theory

Cite this

Junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of errors. / Ryan, Cristín; Ross, Sarah; Davey, Peter; Duncan, Eilidh M; Fielding, Shona; Francis, Jill J; Johnston, Marie; Ker, Jean; Lee, Amanda Jane; Macleod, Mary Joan; Maxwell, Simon; McKay, Gerard; McLay, James; Webb, David J; Bond, Christine.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 76, No. 6, 12.2013, p. 980-987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryan, Cristín ; Ross, Sarah ; Davey, Peter ; Duncan, Eilidh M ; Fielding, Shona ; Francis, Jill J ; Johnston, Marie ; Ker, Jean ; Lee, Amanda Jane ; Macleod, Mary Joan ; Maxwell, Simon ; McKay, Gerard ; McLay, James ; Webb, David J ; Bond, Christine. / Junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of errors. In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2013 ; Vol. 76, No. 6. pp. 980-987.
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