Kinetic study of aggregation of milk protein and/or surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions by Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation

Stella Kenta, Vassilios Raikos, Artemis Vagena, Dimitrios Sevastos, John Kapolos, Athanasia Koliadima, George Karaiskakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Milk proteins are able to facilitate the formation and stabilization of oil droplets in food emulsions. This study employed Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) to monitor changes in particle size distribution of freshly prepared emulsions with varying weight contributions of sodium caseinate (SC) and whey protein concentrate (WPC). The effect of the addition of Tween 80 (T) on the initial droplet size was also investigated. The results indicated that emulsifying ability follows the order Tween 80 > WPC > SC, with corresponding weight average droplet diameter of 0.319, 0.487 and 0.531 μm respectively, when each of the above emulsifiers was used solely. The stability of sodium caseinate emulsions was studied at 30.5 and 80.0 °C by measuring the particle size distribution for a period of 70. h. Emulsions withstood the temperatures and exhibited an initial increase in particle size distribution caused by heat-induced droplet aggregation, followed by a decrease to approximately the initial droplet size. The rate of droplet aggregation depends on the severity of thermal processing, as revealed by the kinetics of particle aggregation during aging at different temperatures. Comparison of the experimental rate constants found from SdFFF, with those determined theoretically gives invaluable information about the oil droplet stability and the aggregation mechanism. Based on the proposed mechanistic scheme various physicochemical quantities, which are very important in explaining the stability of oil-in-water emulsions, were determined. Finally, the advantages of SdFFF in studying the aggregation of the oil-in-water droplets, in comparison with other methods used for the same purpose, are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-229
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Chromatography A
Volume1305
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Field Flow Fractionation
Milk Proteins
Fractionation
Emulsions
Sedimentation
Surface-Active Agents
Flow fields
Oils
Agglomeration
Caseins
Kinetics
Particle Size
Water
Polysorbates
Particle size analysis
Hot Temperature
Weights and Measures
Temperature
Food
Rate constants

Keywords

  • SdFFF
  • emulsion
  • sodium caseinate
  • whey protein
  • Tween 80
  • kinetics of aggregation

Cite this

Kinetic study of aggregation of milk protein and/or surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions by Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation. / Kenta, Stella; Raikos, Vassilios; Vagena, Artemis; Sevastos, Dimitrios; Kapolos, John; Koliadima, Athanasia; Karaiskakis, George.

In: Journal of Chromatography A, Vol. 1305, 30.08.2013, p. 221-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kenta, Stella ; Raikos, Vassilios ; Vagena, Artemis ; Sevastos, Dimitrios ; Kapolos, John ; Koliadima, Athanasia ; Karaiskakis, George. / Kinetic study of aggregation of milk protein and/or surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions by Sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation. In: Journal of Chromatography A. 2013 ; Vol. 1305. pp. 221-229.
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