Learning our way into the future public health: A proposition

P. Hanlon, S. Carlisle, M. Hannah, A. Lyon, D. Reilly

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article attempts to bridge the gap between the values and skills that currently inform public health and those that we need to confront the future. We draw on a set of radical arguments. Firstly, the ability of modern people to understand, predict and control the natural world has brought many benefits but evidence is accumulating that the methods and mindsets of modernity are subject to diminishing returns and adverse effects. This is manifest in the rise of new epidemics: obesity, addiction-related harm, loss of well-being, rising rates of depression and anxiety and widening inequalities. Secondly, there is little evidence that people are embracing new forms of thinking or practice, despite other threats which have the potential for massive effects on many lives, such as climate change and peak oil. Thirdly, if the problems we face may indicate that 'modernity' is in decline because unsustainable, then profound change is necessary if we are to avoid collapse. This analysis suggests that public health needs a new approach. We set out propositions and models that could help us learn our way into the future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)335-342
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Public Health
    Volume33
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2011

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    Public Health
    Learning
    Aptitude
    Climate Change
    Oils
    Anxiety
    Obesity
    Depression
    Thinking

    Cite this

    Hanlon, P., Carlisle, S., Hannah, M., Lyon, A., & Reilly, D. (2011). Learning our way into the future public health: A proposition. Journal of Public Health, 33(3), 335-342. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdr061

    Learning our way into the future public health : A proposition. / Hanlon, P.; Carlisle, S.; Hannah, M.; Lyon, A.; Reilly, D.

    In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 335-342.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hanlon, P, Carlisle, S, Hannah, M, Lyon, A & Reilly, D 2011, 'Learning our way into the future public health: A proposition', Journal of Public Health, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 335-342. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdr061
    Hanlon, P. ; Carlisle, S. ; Hannah, M. ; Lyon, A. ; Reilly, D. / Learning our way into the future public health : A proposition. In: Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 335-342.
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