Leptin receptors

Elizabeth C Cottrell, Julian G Mercer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hormone leptin, secreted predominantly from adipose tissue, plays a crucial role in the regulation of numerous neuroendocrine functions, from energy homeostasis to reproduction. Genetic deficiency as a consequence of leptin or leptin receptor mutations, although rare in humans, leads to early onset of chronic hyperphagia and massive obesity. In most human obesity, however, leptin levels are chronically elevated. Under these conditions of persistent hyperleptinaemia, and particularly when obesity is associated with a high-fat diet, leptin resistance develops, and signalling through the leptin receptor is curtailed, fuelling further weight gain. Here, we review the role of leptin receptors in the regulation of feeding and obesity development. Leptin receptors are found in each of the major components of the CNS "feeding" circuitry-the brainstem, hypothalamus and distributed reward centres. Through these receptors, leptin exerts influences on signalling and integration within these circuits to alter feeding behaviours. Although some progress is now being made with peptide analogues, the leptin receptor has not proved to be amenable to small molecule pharmacological intervention to date. Where clinical benefit from recombinant leptin administration has been achieved, this has been under circumstances of complete endogenous leptin deficiency or relative hypoleptinaemia such as in lipodystrophy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAppetite Control
EditorsHans-Georg Joost
PublisherSpringer
Pages3-21
Number of pages19
Volume209
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-642-24716-3
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-24715-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Publication series

NameHandbook of Experimental Pharmacology
PublisherSpringer
Volume209
ISSN (Print)0171-2004

Fingerprint

Leptin Receptors
Leptin
Obesity
Lipodystrophy
Hyperphagia
High Fat Diet
Feeding Behavior
Reward
Hypothalamus
Brain Stem
Weight Gain
Reproduction
Adipose Tissue
Homeostasis
Hormones
Pharmacology
Peptides
Mutation

Keywords

  • leptin
  • leptin receptors
  • obesity

Cite this

Cottrell, E. C., & Mercer, J. G. (2012). Leptin receptors. In H-G. Joost (Ed.), Appetite Control (Vol. 209, pp. 3-21). (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology; Vol. 209). Springer . https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24716-3_1

Leptin receptors. / Cottrell, Elizabeth C; Mercer, Julian G.

Appetite Control. ed. / Hans-Georg Joost. Vol. 209 Springer , 2012. p. 3-21 (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology; Vol. 209).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cottrell, EC & Mercer, JG 2012, Leptin receptors. in H-G Joost (ed.), Appetite Control. vol. 209, Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, vol. 209, Springer , pp. 3-21. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24716-3_1
Cottrell EC, Mercer JG. Leptin receptors. In Joost H-G, editor, Appetite Control. Vol. 209. Springer . 2012. p. 3-21. (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24716-3_1
Cottrell, Elizabeth C ; Mercer, Julian G. / Leptin receptors. Appetite Control. editor / Hans-Georg Joost. Vol. 209 Springer , 2012. pp. 3-21 (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology).
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