Liver iron status and associated haematological parameters in relation to fetal growth and pregnancy outcome in rapidly growing adolescent sheep carrying a singleton lamb derived by embryo transfer

Justin Luther, Raymond Aitken, John Milne, Harry J. McArdle, Lorraine Gambling, Lawrence Reynolds, Dale Redmer, Jacqueline Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal and fetal liver iron concentrations and associated haematology parameters were determined in an adolescent sheep paradigm characterised by rapid maternal growth, premature delivery and feto-placental growth restriction. Singleton-bearing dams were offered a control or high dietary intake to induce normal or growth-restricted pregnancies, respectively. Pregnancies were terminated on Day 90 or 130 of gestation or progressed to term. Relative blood volume increased (P <0.05) and liver iron concentration decreased (P <0.003) from mid to late gestation in control, but not in high-intake dams. At 90 and 130 days gestation, liver iron concentrations were reduced (P <0.001) in high-intake dams but fetal liver iron was independent of dam nutrition. High intakes leading to poor pregnancy outcome at term were characterised by increased maternal haematocrit, haemoglobin, total plasma protein, albumin (all P <0.001) and serum iron (P <0.05), and by reduced oestradiol 17ß (P <0.001) at Day 130. Thus, high dietary intakes that promote rapid maternal growth and adiposity are associated with early depletion of maternal liver iron stores and a relative failure of normal blood volume expansion, which may, in turn, underlie the reduction in uteroplacental blood flows and fetal nutrient delivery previously established for this paradigm.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1230-1236
Number of pages7
JournalReproduction, Fertility and Development
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2010

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pregnancy outcome
Embryo Transfer
fetal development
embryo transfer
Pregnancy Outcome
Fetal Development
Sheep
lambs
Iron
iron
sheep
liver
Mothers
pregnancy
Liver
Pregnancy
blood volume
Growth
Blood Volume
food intake

Keywords

  • adolescent pregnancy
  • blood volume expansion
  • haematology
  • intrauterine growth restriction
  • maternal growth

Cite this

Liver iron status and associated haematological parameters in relation to fetal growth and pregnancy outcome in rapidly growing adolescent sheep carrying a singleton lamb derived by embryo transfer. / Luther, Justin; Aitken, Raymond; Milne, John; McArdle, Harry J.; Gambling, Lorraine; Reynolds, Lawrence; Redmer, Dale; Wallace, Jacqueline.

In: Reproduction, Fertility and Development, Vol. 22, No. 8, 01.10.2010, p. 1230-1236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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