Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences

Jutta Kapfer (Corresponding Author), H. John B. Birks, Vivian A. Felde, Kari Klanderud, Tone Martinessen, Louise C. Ross, Fride H. Schei, Risto Virtanen, John-Arvid Grytnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effect of the anticipated climate change on the stability of vegetation and the factors underlying this stability are not well understood.

Aims: Our objective was to quantify long-term vegetation changes in a range of habitats in northern Europe by exploring species co-occurrences and their links to diversity and productivity gradients.

Methods: We re-sampled vegetation in 16 arctic, mountain and mire sites 20 to 90 years after the original inventories. A site-specific change in species assemblages (stability) was quantified using species co-occurrences. Using a randomisation test we tested whether the changes observed were significantly greater than those expected by chance. Relationships between patterns in vegetation stability and time between surveys, numbers of plots, or species diversity and proxies for productivity, were tested using regression analysis.

Results: At most sites the changes in species co-occurrences of vascular plants and bryophytes were greater than those expected by chance. The changes observed were found to be unrelated to gradients in productivity or diversity.

Conclusions: Changes in species co-occurrences are not strongly linked to diversity or productivity gradients in vegetation, suggesting that other gradients or site-specific factors (e.g. land use or species interactions) may be more important in controlling recent compositional shifts in vegetation in northern Europe.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-302
Number of pages14
JournalPlant Ecology & Diversity
Volume6
Issue number2
Early online date15 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Northern European region
vegetation
productivity
land restoration
vascular plants
mire
revegetation
bryophyte
Arctic region
vascular plant
regression analysis
land use
Europe
mountains
climate change
species diversity
habitats
mountain
habitat
testing

Keywords

  • alpine
  • arctic
  • environmental change
  • meta-analysis
  • mire
  • productivity
  • randomisation test
  • species compositional changes
  • species diversity
  • vegetation dynamics

Cite this

Kapfer, J., Birks, H. J. B., Felde, V. A., Klanderud, K., Martinessen, T., Ross, L. C., ... Grytnes, J-A. (2013). Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences. Plant Ecology & Diversity, 6(2), 289-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2013.782370

Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences. / Kapfer, Jutta (Corresponding Author); Birks, H. John B.; Felde, Vivian A. ; Klanderud, Kari ; Martinessen, Tone; Ross, Louise C.; Schei, Fride H.; Virtanen, Risto; Grytnes, John-Arvid .

In: Plant Ecology & Diversity, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2013, p. 289-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kapfer, J, Birks, HJB, Felde, VA, Klanderud, K, Martinessen, T, Ross, LC, Schei, FH, Virtanen, R & Grytnes, J-A 2013, 'Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences', Plant Ecology & Diversity, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 289-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2013.782370
Kapfer, Jutta ; Birks, H. John B. ; Felde, Vivian A. ; Klanderud, Kari ; Martinessen, Tone ; Ross, Louise C. ; Schei, Fride H. ; Virtanen, Risto ; Grytnes, John-Arvid . / Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences. In: Plant Ecology & Diversity. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 289-302.
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title = "Long-term vegetation stability in northern Europe as assessed by changes in species co-occurrences",
abstract = "Background: The effect of the anticipated climate change on the stability of vegetation and the factors underlying this stability are not well understood.Aims: Our objective was to quantify long-term vegetation changes in a range of habitats in northern Europe by exploring species co-occurrences and their links to diversity and productivity gradients.Methods: We re-sampled vegetation in 16 arctic, mountain and mire sites 20 to 90 years after the original inventories. A site-specific change in species assemblages (stability) was quantified using species co-occurrences. Using a randomisation test we tested whether the changes observed were significantly greater than those expected by chance. Relationships between patterns in vegetation stability and time between surveys, numbers of plots, or species diversity and proxies for productivity, were tested using regression analysis.Results: At most sites the changes in species co-occurrences of vascular plants and bryophytes were greater than those expected by chance. The changes observed were found to be unrelated to gradients in productivity or diversity.Conclusions: Changes in species co-occurrences are not strongly linked to diversity or productivity gradients in vegetation, suggesting that other gradients or site-specific factors (e.g. land use or species interactions) may be more important in controlling recent compositional shifts in vegetation in northern Europe.",
keywords = "alpine, arctic, environmental change, meta-analysis, mire, productivity, randomisation test, species compositional changes, species diversity, vegetation dynamics",
author = "Jutta Kapfer and Birks, {H. John B.} and Felde, {Vivian A.} and Kari Klanderud and Tone Martinessen and Ross, {Louise C.} and Schei, {Fride H.} and Risto Virtanen and John-Arvid Grytnes",
note = "We are grateful to Jessica Wells Abbott, Kathrin Bockm{\"u}hl, Sondre Dahle, Walter L. Kapfer, Therese Kronstad, Konstanze Kulpa, Aslaug H. Laukeland, H{\aa}vard Laukeland, Jonathan Lenoir, Elisabeth Maquart, Teppo R{\"a}m{\"a}, Maarit Siekkinen, Tom Halfdan Tobiassen, Elina Viirret, and Brooke Wilkerson for their help in the field. The study was funded by the Norwegian Research Council. The re-sampling in Kilpisj{\"a}rvi was supported by the University of Oulu, and the re-sampling in Scotland was given support by the UK Natural Environment Research Council and Scottish Natural Heritage. Field work on Svalbard and on Jan Mayen received the support of the Norwegian Polar Institute (SSF Field Grant 2009, 2010). Finally, we thank Stefan Dullinger and three anonymous reviewers for useful comments on earlier versions of this article.",
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AU - Kapfer, Jutta

AU - Birks, H. John B.

AU - Felde, Vivian A.

AU - Klanderud, Kari

AU - Martinessen, Tone

AU - Ross, Louise C.

AU - Schei, Fride H.

AU - Virtanen, Risto

AU - Grytnes, John-Arvid

N1 - We are grateful to Jessica Wells Abbott, Kathrin Bockmühl, Sondre Dahle, Walter L. Kapfer, Therese Kronstad, Konstanze Kulpa, Aslaug H. Laukeland, Håvard Laukeland, Jonathan Lenoir, Elisabeth Maquart, Teppo Rämä, Maarit Siekkinen, Tom Halfdan Tobiassen, Elina Viirret, and Brooke Wilkerson for their help in the field. The study was funded by the Norwegian Research Council. The re-sampling in Kilpisjärvi was supported by the University of Oulu, and the re-sampling in Scotland was given support by the UK Natural Environment Research Council and Scottish Natural Heritage. Field work on Svalbard and on Jan Mayen received the support of the Norwegian Polar Institute (SSF Field Grant 2009, 2010). Finally, we thank Stefan Dullinger and three anonymous reviewers for useful comments on earlier versions of this article.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: The effect of the anticipated climate change on the stability of vegetation and the factors underlying this stability are not well understood.Aims: Our objective was to quantify long-term vegetation changes in a range of habitats in northern Europe by exploring species co-occurrences and their links to diversity and productivity gradients.Methods: We re-sampled vegetation in 16 arctic, mountain and mire sites 20 to 90 years after the original inventories. A site-specific change in species assemblages (stability) was quantified using species co-occurrences. Using a randomisation test we tested whether the changes observed were significantly greater than those expected by chance. Relationships between patterns in vegetation stability and time between surveys, numbers of plots, or species diversity and proxies for productivity, were tested using regression analysis.Results: At most sites the changes in species co-occurrences of vascular plants and bryophytes were greater than those expected by chance. The changes observed were found to be unrelated to gradients in productivity or diversity.Conclusions: Changes in species co-occurrences are not strongly linked to diversity or productivity gradients in vegetation, suggesting that other gradients or site-specific factors (e.g. land use or species interactions) may be more important in controlling recent compositional shifts in vegetation in northern Europe.

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KW - alpine

KW - arctic

KW - environmental change

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KW - productivity

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KW - species compositional changes

KW - species diversity

KW - vegetation dynamics

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JF - Plant Ecology & Diversity

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ER -