Low back pain among textile workers: A cross-sectional study

P. Paudyal*, J. G. Ayres, S. Semple, G. J. Macfarlane

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent occupational health problems in industrialized countries. Little is known about the epidemiology of LBP in developing countries. Aims To determine the prevalence of LBP among Nepalese textile workers and to investigate the influence of exposure to mechanical and other factors on LBP reporting. Methods Interviewers completed questionnaires with study subjects, and work-related mechanical exposures were measured by self-completed questionnaires. Associations of LBP with mechanical factors and somatic symptoms were determined by logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Nine hundred and thirty-eight workers took part, a participation rate of 92%. The 1 month period prevalence of LBP was 35% (n = 324), being higher in females than males (45% versus 28%; P < 0.001). Several work-related mechanical factors were associated with increased odds of reporting LBP: lifting heavy weights with one hand (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8), pushing weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2–2.3 and pulling weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1–2.1). No association was found with working posture. Strong associations were found for reporting one (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.7–3.4) or two somatic symptoms (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.4–5.1). On multivariable analysis, reporting of somatic symptoms (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.5–5.4), female gender (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5–3.1) and increasing age were significantly associated with increased risk of reporting LBP (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2–2.5), but no associations were found with mechanical factors.
Conclusions This study suggests that mechanical load may not be the leading cause of LBP and adds to evidence that psychological factors play an important role in LBP in non-industrialized countries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-134
Number of pages6
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume63
Issue number2
Early online date15 Feb 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Textiles
Low Back Pain
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Weight Lifting
Weights and Measures
Occupational Health
Back Pain
Posture
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Epidemiology
Hand
Logistic Models
Psychology

Keywords

  • Low back pain
  • Nepal
  • Occupational
  • Textile

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Low back pain among textile workers : A cross-sectional study. / Paudyal, P.; Ayres, J. G.; Semple, S.; Macfarlane, G. J.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.03.2013, p. 129-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paudyal, P. ; Ayres, J. G. ; Semple, S. ; Macfarlane, G. J. / Low back pain among textile workers : A cross-sectional study. In: Occupational Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 129-134.
@article{37329fc503194846828d0f9bc591d4e5,
title = "Low back pain among textile workers: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent occupational health problems in industrialized countries. Little is known about the epidemiology of LBP in developing countries. Aims To determine the prevalence of LBP among Nepalese textile workers and to investigate the influence of exposure to mechanical and other factors on LBP reporting. Methods Interviewers completed questionnaires with study subjects, and work-related mechanical exposures were measured by self-completed questionnaires. Associations of LBP with mechanical factors and somatic symptoms were determined by logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI). Results Nine hundred and thirty-eight workers took part, a participation rate of 92{\%}. The 1 month period prevalence of LBP was 35{\%} (n = 324), being higher in females than males (45{\%} versus 28{\%}; P < 0.001). Several work-related mechanical factors were associated with increased odds of reporting LBP: lifting heavy weights with one hand (OR 1.7; 95{\%} CI 1.1–2.8), pushing weights (OR 1.6; 95{\%} CI 1.2–2.3 and pulling weights (OR 1.6; 95{\%} CI 1.1–2.1). No association was found with working posture. Strong associations were found for reporting one (OR 2.4; 95{\%} CI 1.7–3.4) or two somatic symptoms (OR 2.7; 95{\%} CI 1.4–5.1). On multivariable analysis, reporting of somatic symptoms (OR 2.8; 95{\%} CI 1.5–5.4), female gender (OR 2.2; 95{\%} CI 1.5–3.1) and increasing age were significantly associated with increased risk of reporting LBP (OR 1.7; 95{\%} CI 1.2–2.5), but no associations were found with mechanical factors.Conclusions This study suggests that mechanical load may not be the leading cause of LBP and adds to evidence that psychological factors play an important role in LBP in non-industrialized countries.",
keywords = "Low back pain, Nepal, Occupational, Textile",
author = "P. Paudyal and Ayres, {J. G.} and S. Semple and Macfarlane, {G. J.}",
note = "Funding Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen and the British Cotton Growers Association (EV025RGH0414). Acknowledgements We are grateful to all the industries and workers participated in this study, to Santosh Gaihre for his help in administrating the questionnaire and to steering committee member Dr Rob Niven for his advice during the planning phase of the study. P.P. is currently employed by the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for the South West Peninsula. Support from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) in England for P.P.’s contribution is gratefully acknowledged. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health in England.",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/occmed/kqs231",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "129--134",
journal = "Occupational Medicine",
issn = "0962-7480",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low back pain among textile workers

T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Paudyal, P.

AU - Ayres, J. G.

AU - Semple, S.

AU - Macfarlane, G. J.

N1 - Funding Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen and the British Cotton Growers Association (EV025RGH0414). Acknowledgements We are grateful to all the industries and workers participated in this study, to Santosh Gaihre for his help in administrating the questionnaire and to steering committee member Dr Rob Niven for his advice during the planning phase of the study. P.P. is currently employed by the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for the South West Peninsula. Support from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) in England for P.P.’s contribution is gratefully acknowledged. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health in England.

PY - 2013/3/1

Y1 - 2013/3/1

N2 - Background Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent occupational health problems in industrialized countries. Little is known about the epidemiology of LBP in developing countries. Aims To determine the prevalence of LBP among Nepalese textile workers and to investigate the influence of exposure to mechanical and other factors on LBP reporting. Methods Interviewers completed questionnaires with study subjects, and work-related mechanical exposures were measured by self-completed questionnaires. Associations of LBP with mechanical factors and somatic symptoms were determined by logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Nine hundred and thirty-eight workers took part, a participation rate of 92%. The 1 month period prevalence of LBP was 35% (n = 324), being higher in females than males (45% versus 28%; P < 0.001). Several work-related mechanical factors were associated with increased odds of reporting LBP: lifting heavy weights with one hand (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8), pushing weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2–2.3 and pulling weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1–2.1). No association was found with working posture. Strong associations were found for reporting one (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.7–3.4) or two somatic symptoms (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.4–5.1). On multivariable analysis, reporting of somatic symptoms (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.5–5.4), female gender (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5–3.1) and increasing age were significantly associated with increased risk of reporting LBP (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2–2.5), but no associations were found with mechanical factors.Conclusions This study suggests that mechanical load may not be the leading cause of LBP and adds to evidence that psychological factors play an important role in LBP in non-industrialized countries.

AB - Background Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent occupational health problems in industrialized countries. Little is known about the epidemiology of LBP in developing countries. Aims To determine the prevalence of LBP among Nepalese textile workers and to investigate the influence of exposure to mechanical and other factors on LBP reporting. Methods Interviewers completed questionnaires with study subjects, and work-related mechanical exposures were measured by self-completed questionnaires. Associations of LBP with mechanical factors and somatic symptoms were determined by logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Nine hundred and thirty-eight workers took part, a participation rate of 92%. The 1 month period prevalence of LBP was 35% (n = 324), being higher in females than males (45% versus 28%; P < 0.001). Several work-related mechanical factors were associated with increased odds of reporting LBP: lifting heavy weights with one hand (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8), pushing weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2–2.3 and pulling weights (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1–2.1). No association was found with working posture. Strong associations were found for reporting one (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.7–3.4) or two somatic symptoms (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.4–5.1). On multivariable analysis, reporting of somatic symptoms (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.5–5.4), female gender (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5–3.1) and increasing age were significantly associated with increased risk of reporting LBP (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.2–2.5), but no associations were found with mechanical factors.Conclusions This study suggests that mechanical load may not be the leading cause of LBP and adds to evidence that psychological factors play an important role in LBP in non-industrialized countries.

KW - Low back pain

KW - Nepal

KW - Occupational

KW - Textile

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876939173&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/occmed/kqs231

DO - 10.1093/occmed/kqs231

M3 - Article

C2 - 23359395

AN - SCOPUS:84876939173

VL - 63

SP - 129

EP - 134

JO - Occupational Medicine

JF - Occupational Medicine

SN - 0962-7480

IS - 2

ER -